November 2017

{Photo Credit: WHO Uganda.}The GHSA High-Level Ministerial Meeting was hosted by the Government of Uganda.Photo Credit: WHO Uganda.

At the 4th Global Health Security High-Level Ministerial Meeting held in Uganda on October 25-27, “Health Security for All: Engaging Communities, Non-governmental Organizations, and the Private Sector,” more than 600 participants including ministers from 41 countries recommitted to and eagerly embraced the agreements made under the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) to accelerate progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats.

The GHSA initiative was launched in 2014 to increase the capacity of countries to prevent disease outbreaks from becoming epidemics. The meeting brought together senior leaders across many sectors of government, international organizations, and nongovernmental stakeholders to evaluate the progress made so far and prioritize actions needed to close the gaps that remain. To succeed, nations recognized the urgent need to refine and improve their health systems – so that they are capable of delivering everything it takes to keep people healthy and safe from infectious disease threats.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) was proud to be among the participants, drawing on more than 45 years of experience supporting countries to build the prevention, rapid detection, and effective response needed to mitigate global health threats.

{Photo credit: Brooke Barker/MSH}Participants in an LDP+ in Bangolo, Cote d'Ivoire.Photo credit: Brooke Barker/MSH

In 2014, an Ebola outbreak that started in Guinea and quickly spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone threatened health systems across West Africa. During the crisis, the Côte d’Ivoire National Institute of Public Health (INSP) mobilized a One Health cross-sectoral collaboration in the country’s western regions bordering the Ebola-affected countries and established committees to address the epidemic.

Thanks to emergency funds made available by USAID, the Leadership, Management and Governance (LMG) project, led by MSH, quickly focused on supporting the committees to form and run more efficiently.  A six-year, global project that strengthened health systems to deliver more responsive services to more people—LMG also placed technical advisors at the regional health offices to support integrated supportive supervision visits, data validation workshops, planning, coordination, and communication.

 {Photo: Gabriel Daniel/MSH}Data clerks, hospital pharmacists, and representatives from the DDMS and SIAPS enter data and discuss eTR operations at Ola During and PCMH hospitals in August 2017.Photo: Gabriel Daniel/MSH

Irrational medicine use and poor pharmaceutical management are widespread problems throughout all levels of Sierra Leone’s health system. Misuse, underuse, and overuse of medicines are particularly worrying because they contribute to the rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and threaten the effective prevention and treatment of infections caused by bacteria, parasites, and viruses.

Recognizing that coordinated action is needed to minimize the emergence and spread of AMR, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has catalyzed multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral coalitions to build awareness of the threat of AMR and advocate for its containment.

As part of its post-Ebola recovery work to strengthen its pharmaceutical system, Sierra Leone’s Directorate of Drugs and Medical Supplies (DDMS) partnered with the US Agency for International Development-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceutical and Services (SIAPS) Program, implemented by MSH, to develop efficient procurement, distribution, and inventory systems and establish stakeholder coordination and oversight mechanisms known as hospital Drug and Therapeutics Committees (DTCs).

Printer Friendly Version