October 2013

 {Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH}Jeffrey Sachs speaking at "A Healthy Future for All: Making UHC a Post-2015 Priority".Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH

After last Monday’s event launching a report on equity in universal health coverage (UHC), I observed that the global UHC movement can gain broader support by refining its messages to connect with the core values of civil society and provide reassurance that UHC is feasible for low-income countries. It was clear after last Tuesday’s event in New York—hosted by MSH, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Thai UN mission—that to gain support among disease-specific advocates in post-2015 discussions, the UHC movement must also clarify how a UHC goal would relate to disease-specific priorities in the new development framework.

Put another way: what exactly would UHC cover as a post-2015 goal?

{Photo credit: Rui Pires, Ghana}Photo credit: Rui Pires, Ghana

MSH reconfirmed its commitment to ending childhood deaths due to diarrhea and pneumonia by renewing its endorsement of the Declaration on Scaling Up Treatment of Diarrhea and Pneumonia (PDF).

MSH has a long history of acting on two of the areas specifically outlined in the declaration, namely promoting "access to affordable, high-quality, over-the-counter ORS and zinc products and/or access to and rational use of amoxicillin in both public and private sectors" and supporting "sustained demand creation to increase awareness of use for diarrhea and/or pneumonia treatments, including teaching caregivers when and where to seek treatment and improving knowledge and skills of health providers to promote and deliver appropriate treatment and care."

Devex.com features a video interview with MSH President and CEO Dr. Jonathan D. Quick at the Clinton Global Initiative. Eliza Villarino writes:

For some, universal health coverage is a remote vision. The idea, according to Management Sciences for Health President and CEO Jonathan Quick, is actually not that far-fetched.

Universal health coverage refers to the commitment of countries to provide basic health, prevention and treatment services to all their citizens without financially burdening them. Today, 50 countries, including 20 lower-middlie-income countries offer such coverage, Quick noted in an exclusive interview with Devex on the sidelines of the 2013 Clinton Global Initiative annual gathering in New York.

"I think the biggest thing that’s happening right now that affects health systems is the movement toward universal health coverage," Quick said.

He also explained why investment in global health is one of the best ways to improve U.S. image abroad and security at home. How?

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

We call on you to celebrate the girl child, read and support the Girl Declaration—a call to action for the post-2015 development agenda to prioritize girls and stop poverty before it begins—and help educate and empower the girl child in all of us. Many of us are shaped by what we experience as children. For those in high-income countries, the world of the girl child is often full of possibilities and options. However, for many in low- and middle-income countries, the girl child lives in a world fraught with harsh realities and limited choices. To understand the journey of women, we must look at the girl child not only as a period in one’s life but as one which continues to live in all of us as we reach adulthood and beyond. "I was not put on this earth to be invisible."

{Photo credit: Rui Pires}Photo credit: Rui Pires

A global movement toward universal health coverage (UHC) is emerging. Fifteen global civil society organizations signed a statement urging UN countries to include UHC in post-Millennium Development goals (MDGs).

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

At the Devex Partnerships Forum, being held today in Nairobi, Kenya, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) urged the private sector to collaborate with health institutions to improve management, enable better service delivery, and lower the cost of healthcare in Kenya.

With the healthcare service being devolved to counties in Kenya, a number of challenges exist, such as unequal distribution of human and material resources to health facilities. This strains the governance of the institutions as the few personnel are stretched, handling large clientele as well as administration.

MSH partnered with higher learning institutions to develop curriculums on leadership and governance which can be pursued by health workers. Such leadership curriculums will assist stakeholders to ensure the right people are employed for the right job.

Watch MSH Kenya: Envisioning A World Where Everyone in Kenya Has the Opportunity for a Healthy Life

{Photo by Warren Zelman.}Photo by Warren Zelman.

This post also appeared on Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimists Blog and on Frontline Health Workers Coalition's website.

In a week and a half, as a team of our colleagues arrive in Ethiopia for this year’s International Conference on Family Planning, others will already be in Brazil for the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health. This year’s HRH Forum addresses universal health coverage (UHC), a concept which continues to gain momentum as the focus of global health efforts from institutions like the World Bank and World Health Organization (WHO).

It’s symbolic that these two meetings are happening half a world apart: as movements around family planning, health workforce and UHC have advanced, there has been too little dialogue and collaboration across these communities.

Printer Friendly Version