Dí¨yí¨ mí²n gen mí²n

Dí¨yí¨ mí²n gen mí²n

Ryan Cherlin, USAID, wrote this blog after a recent visit to Haiti. This blog post was originally posted on USAID's IMPACT Blog.

A woman holds one of the USAID hygiene kits at a Cholera Treatment Center on Thursday, Oct. 28, in Verrettes in the Artibonite department of Haiti. The center, run by USAID partner International Medical Corps, opened earlier this week.

 

When a Haitian says, Dí¨yí¨  mí²n gen  mí²n, they mean to say, as you solve one problem there is always another that must also be solved.

Driving through the densely populated city of Port-au-Prince I wondered how many times this old proverb was the subject of conversation this past year.

In the months following the earthquake in early January 2010, Haitians endured the devastating effects of hurricane Tomas, political instability and violence stemming from a presidential election, and a cholera epidemic.

Perhaps more numerous than the aggregate woes that befell this nation are the number of foreign aid workers and spotted NGO sites funded by international donor organizations like USAID. These organizations continue the behemoth task of delivering the humanitarian and development assistance so desperately needed by the Haitian people. Despite some media reports of stagnant progress, one only has to scratch the surface to realize these programs are making a real difference.

I decided to sit down with USAID beneficiaries from Haiti’s famed Cité Soleil, an extremely impoverished and densely populated commune generally regarded as one of the most dangerous areas in the Western Hemisphere. I wanted to get a sense of the impact USAID programs have in an environment seemingly impervious to progress.

Etienne Jean-Gardy and Ernancy Bien-Aime  are two youth educators trained by a USAID Leadership Development Program (LDP) led by Management Sciences for Health that sensitizes community members to the importance of family planning and HIV prevention and awareness.  Armed with knowledge received in training, they host meetings in local parks, in homes and in schools to disseminate their message in Cité Soleil.

Photo by Kendra Helmer/USAID

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