World Health Assembly

An Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDOs) dispenser in Tanzania, an example of a successful, scale-able public-private sector collaboration. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Chronic diseases --- notably cancers, cardiovascular diseases, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes --- now account for nearly 35 million deaths annually. The human and economic burden of chronic diseases are staggering, especially in developing countries. Left unchecked, by 2030 the epidemic will kill twice as many people in low- and middle-income countries as it does today.

One year ago, the world came together to address this emerging global epidemic. Country representatives, policy makers, and civil society convened in New York for the United Nations (UN) High-Level Meeting on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs), and the UN General Assembly adopted a declaration, promising to strengthen and accelerate the response.

{Photo credit: deltaMike via FlickR.}Photo credit: deltaMike via FlickR.

Co-authored by Gina Lagomarsino, managing director for Results for Development Institute

Cross-posted on UHC Forward.

We welcome the United States Supreme Court decision to uphold President Obama’s sweeping health care overhaul. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires all Americans to have health insurance, which will dramatically increase both equitable access and the health of Americans.

It also adds the US to the growing list of countries on the path to universal health coverage.

US Affordable Care Act a good step forward

We have learned that countries must create systems that reflect their history and their current realities. In the US, this means improving upon a system dominated by private insurers that historically have been able to provide subjective and selective coverage – denying coverage or charging exorbitant premiums to those most in need.

To provide health care coverage for all in the US, it was critical that the ACA accomplish the following goals:

{Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Over 100 conference delegates came together at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development last week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to strategize smart solutions to global development and poverty reduction while promoting environmental concerns such as clean energy, sustainability, and equitable use of resources.  Popularly known as “Rio+20” --- for occurring twenty years after the 1992 Earth Summit  --- the three days of high-level meetings attended by heads of state and government and high level representatives resulted in “The Future We Want,” a 53-page document that outlines and renews global commitments to sustainable, earth-friendly development.

The NCD Alliance announced today that delegates at the 65th World Health Assembly are likely to pass a historic target on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) tomorrow, May 26.

The NCD Alliance, a network of over 2,000 civil society organizations, including Management Sciences for Health, urged delegates to "support comprehensive Global Monitoring Framework and Targets; support the establishment of a Global Coordinating Platform on NCDs; and put NCDs at the heart of the post-2015 development agenda."

Civil society call to action on universal health coverage.Civil society call to action on universal health coverage.

At the 65th World Health Assembly this week, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and civil society organizations from three continents launched a joint call to action on universal health coverage (UHC). The statement -- initiated by Action for Global Health, Centre for Health & Social Services (CHeSS), Doctors of the WorldMedicus Mundi InternationalOxfamSave the Children, and MSH -- calls on political and world leaders, governments and ministries of health, and civil society to take a stand for UHC.

Three women gather outside a Tanzanian health center. {Photo credit: M. Paydos/MSH.}Photo credit: M. Paydos/MSH.

The 65th World Health Assembly is convening this week in Geneva, beginning May 21. For six days, the Assembly will focus the world’s attention on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs), universal health coverage, mental disorders, nutrition and adolescent pregnancy, among other health issues.

This is the second time in less than a year that chronic NCDs --- such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and lung diseases --- are in the international spotlight. Last fall, the High Level Summit on Non-Communicable Diseases convened in New York, when, for only the second time in the history of the United Nations, a high level summit focused on a global health concern.

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