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{Photo credit: LMS Haiti/MSH}Photo credit: LMS Haiti/MSH

Today, as we celebrate International Youth Day and the theme of “Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward,” we are reminded of difficult situations millions of young people experience every day—and of the power young people have to create change in their lives when they connect with their peers.

Adolescents and young men and women need access to quality, affordable reproductive health services. In the developing world, 52 million never-married women, aged 15-24, are sexually active and in need of reproductive health and HIV prevention services and information. Yet, adolescent girls often face greater barriers than adult women in accessing them. In the sub-Saharan Africa region, only 21 percent of married adolescents are using a modern contraceptive method; and the adolescent birth rate in the region is four times the rate in Europe and Central Asia. In the Latin America region, teenagers have doubled their proportion of the fertility rate from 8.5 percent in 1955 to 14.3 percent in 2005, despite a steady decline in overall fertility numbers.

Did you notice that our website looks and feels really different?

We've redesigned and rebuilt our site from the ground up: showcasing our unique technical expertise and staff, values, global footprint, and mission to save lives and improve health among the poorest and most vulnerable around the world. 

We also have integrated our Global Health Impact blog into the website to continue cutting-edge discussions on global health.  

And we've made the new MSH.org easier to use.     

Learn more about the new MSH.org

Watch the short video -- and see some of the new features firsthand:

Overcoming Barriers to Health Care for Women in Afghanistan.Overcoming Barriers to Health Care for Women in Afghanistan.

World Health Worker Week (" href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23WHWW&src=hash" target="_blank">) is April 8-12, 2013. Let's show the world just how much . Watch and share the video, thank a health worker, and donate $10 in honor of a health worker. 

"We realized that educating the community was something we had to focus on," says Madina, a trained Afghan midwife, as she describes involving elders and religious leaders in helping to improve access to family planning and perinatal care for women in Khost province, including one woman who came to the health facility suffering complications from a home birth.

Health workers save lives. What will you do to thank a health worker?

Cross-posted from the K4Health Blog.

The overhead lights dim and in the dark, the high-spirited rhythm and melodic line of a Malawian song rises and overtakes the quiet buzz of conversation. We are seated in a large auditorium at the International Conference on Family Planning in Dakar, Senegal and watching the first film focused on the K4Health Malawi project in a festival hosted by Population Services International (PSI).

The film festival is a rich visual and audio break in an intense day filled with technical presentations and serious conversations about what works in programs that promote reproductive health and family planning.

Haiti, One Year On: Realizing Country Ownership in a Fragile State

Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 3:00-5:00 p.m., B-340, Rayburn House Office Building, Capitol Hill
This Washington DC event will be webcast live. You can tune in and join the discussion, below, starting at 3:00 p.m.

Dr. Florence Duperval Guillaume, MSH’s Deputy Chief of Party and Technical Director, Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haíïti, will be discussant at this Oxfam America-hosted policy discussion to examine aid effectiveness in Haiti within the context of country ownership. Other speakers will include:

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