ultrasound

 {Photo Credit: Rui Pires}A pregnant woman is given an ultrasound.Photo Credit: Rui Pires

(This post originally appeared on the Next Billion website.)

Why Greater Ultrasound Availability Doesn’t Always Benefit Patients

Advances in health technologies have reshaped the lives of communities, families and individuals, undoubtedly contributing to better health outcomes around the world. For the most vulnerable populations, technology may significantly improve access to preventive, diagnostic, and treatment services and help increase demand for greater quality care. Yet, despite their potential, new technologies can also add new challenges, risking potential gains in quality, safety or cost. Particularly in settings where health systems are weak, the introduction of technological interventions requires thoughtful execution.

Doreen Nalweyiso happily holding her twins. {Photo credit: T. Athura/MSH.}Photo credit: T. Athura/MSH.

In July 2011, Doreen Nalweyiso, a 27-year-old woman living in Mpigi Town Council, Uganda attended her second antenatal visit at Mpigi Health Centre IV. She was surprised to be examined with an ultrasound machine--and even more shocked to be told that she was expecting twins!

“I was thrilled when the nurse showed me images of twins through the ultrasound TV scan. I had never experienced it in my lifetime,” she explained.

This was her first pregnancy and there was no history of twins in her family. Because carrying multiple fetuses can cause complications for both the mother and babies, Doreen received support from the health center throughout her pregnancy.

Since she knew her delivery could be complicated, Doreen traveled to Mpigi health facility to deliver by caesarian section.

If she hadn’t known she was carrying twins, Doreen might not have known to seek out specialized medical care during labor and delivery.

Norah Nakato (right) receiving care from Fausta Nalukwago, midwife at Mpigi Health Center IV in Uganda. {Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Norah, a 21-year-old teacher at a private school in Nansana, Uganda, did not know she was pregnant. Pain in her lower abdomen prompted her to go for a consultation at a private clinic in Nansana, where a urine test revealed the pregnancy. “I was shocked because I had last had my period on the 15th of that month,” Norah said.

At the clinic, Norah was given an antibiotic and a pain killer to relieve abdominal pain. Norah left the clinic excited about her pregnancy. But, two weeks later, the pain persisted and Norah began bleeding. Her mother advised her to go to Mpigi Health Center IV for an ultrasound.

At the health center, Norah saw a problem on the ultrasound screen. “The doctor showed me what was in my uterus and there was no baby," Norah said. "It was swollen with liquid and unclear substances. He said the substance had to be removed. I was very scared."

After counseling from the doctor, Norah was admitted and given medication to induce labor. When the contractions began, she was taken into surgery.

The doctor advised her to wait at least one and a half years before conceiving another child to allow time for her uterus to heal and the abnormal hormone levels to normalize.

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