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Devex.com features a video interview with MSH President and CEO Dr. Jonathan D. Quick at the Clinton Global Initiative. Eliza Villarino writes:

For some, universal health coverage is a remote vision. The idea, according to Management Sciences for Health President and CEO Jonathan Quick, is actually not that far-fetched.

Universal health coverage refers to the commitment of countries to provide basic health, prevention and treatment services to all their citizens without financially burdening them. Today, 50 countries, including 20 lower-middlie-income countries offer such coverage, Quick noted in an exclusive interview with Devex on the sidelines of the 2013 Clinton Global Initiative annual gathering in New York.

"I think the biggest thing that’s happening right now that affects health systems is the movement toward universal health coverage," Quick said.

He also explained why investment in global health is one of the best ways to improve U.S. image abroad and security at home. How?

 {Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH}Jeffrey Sachs speaking at "A Healthy Future for All: Making UHC a Post-2015 Priority".Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH

After last Monday’s event launching a report on equity in universal health coverage (UHC), I observed that the global UHC movement can gain broader support by refining its messages to connect with the core values of civil society and provide reassurance that UHC is feasible for low-income countries. It was clear after last Tuesday’s event in New York—hosted by MSH, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Thai UN mission—that to gain support among disease-specific advocates in post-2015 discussions, the UHC movement must also clarify how a UHC goal would relate to disease-specific priorities in the new development framework.

Put another way: what exactly would UHC cover as a post-2015 goal?

 {Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Emanuel Bizimungu, a community health worker in eastern Rwanda, examines a girl.Photo credit: Todd Shapera

As the United Nations General Assembly kicks off general debate on the post-2015 development agenda this week, advocates of a universal health coverage (UHC) target are rallying other organizations to build and showcase support around UHC. These efforts include high-profile events on Monday and Tuesday, both hosted by the Rockefeller Foundation with partner support. On Wednesday, Johnson & Johnson hosted an event on the key role of frontline health workers to efforts like these. This post, which originally appeared on The Lancet Global Health Blog, is part of a "Rallying for UHC" series: MSH bloggers expanding on the themes raised by these events and considering the road ahead for UHC in post-2015 discussions. Readers can participate by adding comments on the blog posts, or joining the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag.  

 {Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH}MSH President Dr. Jonathan D. Quick moderates the panel.Photo credit: Paula Champagne/MSH

As the United Nations General Assembly kicks off general debate on the post-2015 development agenda, MSH, Rockefeller Foundation, and the Permanent Mission of Thailand to the United Nations hosted a standing-room only event rallying organizations around making universal health coverage (UHC) a post-2015 priority. "A Healthy Future For All: Making Universal Health Coverage a Post-2015 Priority" was one of two high-profile events hosted by the Rockefeller Foundation with partner support. Watch the webcast recording and view the photo slideshow of "A Healthy Future for All".

{Photo credit: Pan American Health Organization}Photo credit: Pan American Health Organization

As the United Nations General Assembly kicks off general debate on the post-2015 development agenda this week, advocates of a universal health coverage (UHC) target are rallying other organizations to build and showcase support around UHC. These efforts include high-profile events on Monday and Tuesday, both hosted by the Rockefeller Foundation with partner support. On Wednesday, Johnson & Johnson hosts an event on the key role of frontline health workers to efforts like these. 

In a three-part series, MSH bloggers expand on the themes raised by these events and consider the road ahead for UHC in post-2015 discussions. Readers can participate through their organizations—which can sign on to a joint letter to UN Member States supporting a post-2015 UHC target—or as individuals: by urging their organizations to sign the joint letter, adding comments on this blog post, or on Twitter with the hashtag.  

{Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Photo credit: Todd Shapera

Representatives from MSH are participating in events related to global health and the post-2015 development agenda during U.N. General Assembly (UNGA) week in New York City. Follow updates from UNGA week, viewed through the lens of MSH's advocacy for universal health coverage (UHC) as a post-2015 development priority. 

 

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

This post originally appeared as part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and the NGO alliance InterAction around the United Nations General Assembly's 68th session and its general debate on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).  

Thirty years ago, I was a young physician practicing family medicine in rural Talihina, Oklahoma. We saw unusual cases, including snakebites and a man who survived a gunshot through the heart. But what I loved most was delivering babies – bringing new lives into the world and great joy to parents. Sadly, my most vivid memory from those years is of a baby girl who didn’t make it. Her parents, first-time pregnant, didn’t recognize the warning signs. When they reached the hospital, our team was too slow.  Too late.

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

Cross-posted with permission from UHC Forward.

I walked into a pediatric unit of a teaching hospital in Nigeria a few years ago to review a patient. On the first bed was a lifeless child. He was brought in dead a few minutes earlier by his parents. His mother, "Bisi", wept uncontrollably. While in tears, she recounted how difficult it was for them to borrow money to get to the hospital. Although they got some money from a chief in the community, the two-year-old baby died before they got to the hospital.

Kunle’s story touched me deeply. Kunle’s case typifies the plight of many poor people in Nigeria and the rest of sub-Saharan Africa: The financial burden of illness makes many families poorer. People are afraid to go to hospitals because they may not be able to afford the cost of the health services they need. They prefer to buy drugs over the counter, or visit a local herbalist, who will charge little or nothing to provide poor health service.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) welcomes the report of the United Nations High Level Panel (HLP) of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. The HLP’s advisory report, released May 30, is part of an ongoing process of defining the global targets that will replace the Millennium Development Goals. MSH believes the report demonstrates the panel’s ongoing commitment to health as an essential component of sustainable development and improving lives around the world.

The panel named five specific health targets focusing on infant and child health, immunization, maternal mortality, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and high-burden communicable and chronic diseases. While the panel recognized that universal access to basic health services will be necessary to achieve these goals, it did not recommend an explicit target for increasing healthcare access or coverage.

 {Photo credit: MSH/Paula Champagne}Participants of "Medicines as Part of UHC: Starting a Dialogue".Photo credit: MSH/Paula Champagne

What do medicines, financing, governance, and management have in common?

They are all essential pieces of the puzzle that must come together in order to make universal health coverage (UHC) a realizable goal.

From June 2-4, 2013, Management Sciences for Health (MSH), in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation and Harvard Medical School’s Department of Population Medicine, and additional support from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the US Agency for International Development (USAID), brought representatives of countries working towards UHC, private insurance schemes, and medicines and financing experts from across the globe to start a dialogue around medicines coverage under UHC.

Dr. Jonathan Quick, MSH’s President and CEO opened the event: “UHC is about filling the tragic gaps that exist in health systems around the world: gaps in access, in affordability, and health needs that go unanswered.”

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