treatment

Over 33 million people are currently living with HIV & AIDS throughout the world. Despite great strides in slowing the epidemic, there remains a stunning gap in prevention, care, and treatment efforts. This is especially true for most-at-risk-populations, which include commercial sex workers (CSWs) and their clients, injecting drug users (IDUs), men who have sex with men (MSM), and prisoners. People in these risk groups are so stigmatized and discriminated against in many countries that it becomes extremely difficult – sometimes impossible – to provide them with much-needed HIV prevention, care and treatment services. Even more, MARP behaviors often are illegal, which then compromises needed action and support from government authorities.

Denial of such basic human rights as access to prevention, care, and treatment for the most-at-risk-populations is unacceptable. It leaves those most in need underserved and severely marginalized. As World AIDS Day 2010 approaches with this year’s message of “Universal access and human rights,” I am reflecting on the specialized HIV interventions that MSH helps provide to most-at-risk populations.

The results from the first Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) clinical trial, the iPrEx Study, were just made public and published in today’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. In short, the trial showed an overall 44% efficacy in preventing HIV infection in gay, bisexual and transgender subjects who took the daily fixed dose combination antiretroviral pill Truvada (tenofovir [TDF] and emtracitabine [FTC]), compared with participants receiving a placebo. This is the first evidence that oral antiretroviral medications, taken by HIV-negative people before exposure to HIV can reduce the risk of HIV infection. iPrEx is also the first trial showing effectiveness of a new biomedical prevention tool in gay men and other men who have sex with men.

The iPrEx trial enrolled 2,499 participants across 11 sites in six countries---Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and the United States. It is the first PrEP effectiveness trial to report results. This trial was one of a suite of PrEP trials currently ongoing in a range of populations around the world.

During the opening ceremony of the International AIDS Conference, International AIDS Society President Julio Montaner declared “Consensus has arrived. Treatment and prevention are one thing and they are the way forward.” He went on to assert that Treatment 2.0 “is the most effective way forward to deliver on the universal access pledge.”

Later in the ceremony UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe proclaimed “Treatment 2.0 radically simplifies treatment to maximize the number of people who can benefit.”

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