South Sudan

Tanzanian woman (Photo credit: MSH)Tanzanian woman (Photo credit: MSH)

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) invites you to attend the following sessions and poster presentations at the Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania --- whether in person at the Arusha International Conference Center, or watching via archived videos online. (All times are listed in Eastern Africa Time: UTC/GMT +3 hours. Sessions will be recorded and available within 24 hours.)

Sessions: Tuesday, January 15

Improving access to essential maternal health medicines (Track 3): 13:30–15:00 · Simba

Moderator: Deborah Armbruster, USAID

Dr. Stephen Macharia of MSH TB CARE I South Sudan speaking at Union World Conference symposium. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Cross-posted from the MSH at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 blogManagement Sciences for Health (MSH) presented at several symposia and workshops throughout the 43rd Union World Conference on Lung Health (read more).

Friday’s symposium on November 16 dealt with: Saving lives in areas of conflict or disaster: partnering for results (PDF). Dr. Eliud Wandwalo of MSH Tanzania coordinated the session along with Morgan Richardson.

Trying to cross through a flooded section of road in South Sudan. {Photo credit: E. Polich/MSH.}Photo credit: E. Polich/MSH.

“We’re going to try to drive through that?”

After spending nearly two years working in South Sudan, I was on my way with two colleagues to one final meeting. The USAID-funded second phase of the Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP II), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), ended activities on July 31, 2012, and three of us needed to travel 360 kilometers (220 miles) to a results dissemination meeting. A flight booking mishap meant we had no choice but to drive --- during rainy season.

With a key bridge washed out.

And it rained --- down poured --- for over an hour the morning we left.

After passing several toppled trucks, overtaking pickups irrevocably mired in mud, and crossing through a river, we came across the point where I uttered the above quote (“We’re going to try to drive through that?”).

A woman receiving antenatal care in South Sudan. {Photo credit: J. Warren/Save the Children.}Photo credit: J. Warren/Save the Children.

On a dark August night in rural South Sudan, Linda Kenneth felt the swift kick of labor pains begin. Having previously delivered five children, Linda recognized the pains and immediately called for the nearby skilled birth attendant, as it was too late in the evening for her to travel safely to the health facility. In her previous two pregnancies, she had experienced heavy bleeding after delivering, and worried similar complications might arise this time.

South Sudan has the world’s worst maternal mortality ratio (2,054 deaths per 100,000 live births), and roughly one third of these deaths can be attributed to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Administration of misoprostol or another uterotonic (a drug that reduces bleeding after childbirth) could prevent the majority of these deaths. Misoprostol does not require a cold supply chain, and is cheap and effective, making it a perfect candidate for community-based interventions.

Upon the birth attendant’s arrival, Linda presented the three misoprostol pills she had recently been given by a home health promoter. Several days prior, a home health promoter had visited Linda and discussed with her a birth preparedness plan, informing her of the benefits of taking misoprostol immediately after delivery to prevent excessive bleeding.

A physician assesses a mother and children for malaria at a health center in Bujumbura, Burundi. {Photo credit: Rima Shretta/MSH.}Photo credit: Rima Shretta/MSH.

Today, April 25th, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) joins the global community marking World Malaria Day. "Sustain Gains, Save Lives: Invest in Malaria" -- the theme of this year's World Malaria Day -- recognizes this crucial juncture in the global fight against malaria.

Significant gains have been made in the last ten years; since 2000, malaria mortality rates have decreased 25 percent globally, and 33 percent in Africa. However, progress could be reversed unless malaria continues to be a priority for global, regional, and national decision-makers and donors.

Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo), South Sudan, and Uganda are among several MSH countries commemorating World Malaria Day with malaria awareness activities and events, including health talk sessions at football (soccer) games and drama activities with kids.

A woman and baby rest at St. Josephs' Health Center -- the only health institution in Abricots, Haiti. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Suzanna Ile, a 26-year-old woman from South Sudan, lost her first two babies in childbirth. Suzanna did not have a nurse or midwife to tell her that her pelvis was dangerously small for childbirth; nor was there a safe place for a caesarian section even if she had known the risk.

Suzanna’s experience is typical of what women have faced in South Sudan, the newest country in the world. South Sudan is home to 10 million people, spread across an area about the size of France. The people have experienced civil war off and on for five decades --- hardly anyone remembers a time without conflict. In places like the capital city of Juba, the infrastructure has been seriously damaged. The conflicts have devastated the economy and disrupted the education system.

South Sudan has some of the worst health indicators in the world. Health facilities are grossly understaffed as health workers fled the country: only ten percent of staff positions are appropriately filled. There are less than two doctors for every 100,000 people. A woman in South Sudan is five-hundred-times more likely to lose her life giving birth than a woman in Europe. Forty-five percent of children suffer from physical stunting due to malnutrition.

Women and child in Tambura, South Sudan. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Nearly 50 countries, including Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Liberia and South Sudan, are considered a fragile or conflict-affected state -- a state that is in conflict, recovering from conflict or crisis, or a state that has collapsed or has a strong and repressive government. Over nearly 40 years of working in fragile states, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has identified best practices, lessons learned, and appropriate interventions for a myriad of situations in fragile states.

MSH takes an integrated approach to building high-impact sustainable public health programs that address critical challenges in leadership, health systems management, health service delivery, human resources, and medicines. Wherever our partnerships succeed, the positive impact of good health has a ripple effect, contributing to the building of healthy nations.

MSH works collaboratively with health care policymakers, managers, providers, and the private sector to increase the efficacy, efficiency, and sustainability of health services by improving management systems, promoting access to services, and influencing public policy.

Lelo PHCU staff treat the young patient. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

"Diktor! Diktor!" The urgent call for a doctor came from several school boys who had run to the facility. I glanced over and saw a boy about 12 years old tensely sit down in the waiting patio at Lelo Primary Health Care Unit in South Sudan.

All key indicators for SHTP II improve from FY10 to FY11: Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, third dose (DPT3); Intermittent Preventive Therapy, second dose (IPT2); first and fourth antenatal care visits (ANC1, ANC4); skilled birth attendant (SBA) deliveries; and family planning (FP) visits.

 

All project health indicators for the second phase of the USAID-funded Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP II), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in partnership with the International Rescue Committee, have shown improved performance over the past two years.

On the ground, this means that more people are being immunized against diseases, communities are receiving education on HIV, and lives are being improved.

Alice Gune with her son who was treated successfully for neonatal sepsis at the SHTP II-supported Kuda PHCC in South Sudan. Credit: MSH.

Shortly after delivering her baby boy at home, Alice Gune grew nervous for his health. Her baby had a high fever and was obviously uncomfortable and unhappy.

She took him to see Rose Kujang, the Maternal and Child Health Worker, during a community outreach program orchestrated by Kuda Primary Health Care Center (PHCC). Rose examined Alice’s baby and, recognizing the danger signs he presented, immediately referred her to Kuda PHCC for further diagnosing and treatment.

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