Quality of Care

We’re excited to launch MSH Leading Voices, a monthly profile that features the incredible talent that makes up MSH.

We’re chatting with Seneca, our technical advisor for quality of care. Seneca is a Utah native with a passion for improving the health services that every person receives, no matter who they are or where they live. She’s responsible for integrating quality of care initiatives into all MSH health programs. 

What do you think makes MSH different?

Our legacy of working in health systems strengthening and capacity building. Excellence in quality can't be achieved by only one intervention; it's a multi-dimensional mosaic resulting from holistic thinking about an entire system that is enveloped in compassion, equity, and leadership. To that end, I am so excited about the work MSH has done around local leadership development.This is a powerful asset for cultivating a local culture of excellence toward quality of care across the healthcare spectrum. 

What are you most proud of in your work?

MSH representatives at the launch meeting of the Quality of Care Network (L-R): Zipporah Kpamor, MSH Nigeria Country Representative; Erik Schouten, Country Lead, MSH Malawi; Grace Mlava, Technical Clinical Director, ONSE Health in Malawi; Rudi Thetard, Project Director of ONSE Health in Malawi; Catharine Taylor, Vice President of the Health Programs Group, and Antoine Ndiaye, Country Lead, Cote D’Ivoire.

This is the second in a series of four stories about how strong health systems improve the health of women and children.

Nine countries, with support from the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations International Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and other partners, launched the Network for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health last week.

The new Network aims to improve the quality of care that mothers and babies receive in health facilities while supporting countries in achieving their targets agreed under the Sustainable Development Goals to end preventable maternal and newborn deaths. 

Despite remarkable progress in improving access to health services proven to reduce maternal and newborn deaths, every year worldwide, 303,000 women die during pregnancy and childbirth, 2.7 million babies die during the first 28 days of life, and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. Most of these deaths could be prevented with quality care during pregnancy and childbirth.

However, the provision of care is uneven within and between countries, and often fails to respect the rights and dignity of those who seek it.

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