MNCH

All key indicators for SHTP II improve from FY10 to FY11: Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, third dose (DPT3); Intermittent Preventive Therapy, second dose (IPT2); first and fourth antenatal care visits (ANC1, ANC4); skilled birth attendant (SBA) deliveries; and family planning (FP) visits.

 

All project health indicators for the second phase of the USAID-funded Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP II), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in partnership with the International Rescue Committee, have shown improved performance over the past two years.

On the ground, this means that more people are being immunized against diseases, communities are receiving education on HIV, and lives are being improved.

Alice Gune with her son who was treated successfully for neonatal sepsis at the SHTP II-supported Kuda PHCC in South Sudan. Credit: MSH.

Shortly after delivering her baby boy at home, Alice Gune grew nervous for his health. Her baby had a high fever and was obviously uncomfortable and unhappy.

She took him to see Rose Kujang, the Maternal and Child Health Worker, during a community outreach program orchestrated by Kuda Primary Health Care Center (PHCC). Rose examined Alice’s baby and, recognizing the danger signs he presented, immediately referred her to Kuda PHCC for further diagnosing and treatment.

We know how to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. But without intervention nearly 40 percent of mothers with HIV/AIDS in developing countries will transmit the virus to their newborns.

Mother and children, Salima, Malawi, April 2011

Malawi leads the developing world as the first to propose an approach to prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV that addresses the health of the mother. Recently my MSH colleague Erik Schouten and his colleagues in Malawi wrote a commentary in the Lancet about Malawi’s innovative, public health approach to PMTCT. Malawi calls its model “B+” because it complements the World Health Organization’s (WHO) B option, whereby a mother’s CD4 cell count, a measure of the volume of HIV circulating in her blood, determines her eligibility for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART).

I’d like to call attention to an important set of articles in the recent HIV/AIDS themed issue of The Lancet. Erik Schouten of Malawi Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival (BASICS) has published a commentary (free registration required) about Malawi’s push to be the first country to implement a “B+” approach to reducing mother to child transmission.

Blog post updated Dec. 27, 2011.

Taj Bibi learns how to use zinc and oral rehydration salts to treat her child. Photo credit: BASICS/Afghanistan, MSH.

Taj Bibi sits nursing her 5-month-old baby in the kitchen of her home in the village of Sartal in Takhar province in Afghanistan’s north. The room is dark; the only natural light comes from the doorway to the dusty courtyard outside. The sound of her children playing echoes across the small family compound.

Bibi’s first two children died -- one of them from severe diarrhea -- because the family could not afford to take them to the doctor. “Now, if our children get diarrhea or any other illness, I take them to the community health worker,” she said.

Community health workers (CHWs) are the building blocks of the Afghan health system, bringing basic health services to villages across the country.

The community midwife sitting with Suzanna Ile and her son, Modi, in South Sudan. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Blog post updated Dec. 27, 2011.

Suzanna Ile is a 26-year old woman from Lokiliri Payam in South Sudan. Suzanna lost her first two babies in child birth. During her third pregnancy, a community midwife at Lokiliri Primary Healthcare Centre -- a health facility supported by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) through the MSH-led Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP II) -- recognized Suzanna’s contracted pelvis and identified her high risk pregnancy.

Without access to emergency services and a health facility capable of performing a Caesarean section, the midwife knew Suzanna would likely lose her third child as well. A contracted pelvis often results in obstructed labor, fistulas, postpartum hemorrhage, or the death of the infant and mother. The midwife discussed with Suzanna alternative delivery options during an antenatal care visit.

A team of experts from WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, and World Bank recently published a report on maternal mortality entitled “Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2008" (PDF).

The document reports some fantastic news about a public health indicator that has until recently refused to budge. That indicator is the maternal mortality ratio, the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. The improvement between 1990 and 2008 is significant and promising.

The part of the report that received much less coverage relates to HIV and its strong, adverse effect on maternal mortality. The authors estimate that in 2008 there were 42,000 deaths due to HIV & AIDS among pregnant women and approximately half of those were maternal deaths. In absence of HIV we would have had 337,000 maternal deaths in 2008 instead of 358,000.

This blog was originally posted on Global Health Council’s Blog 4 Global Health. This is a guest blog written by Aaron Emmel, government affairs officer at PATH, one of the sponsors of the event.

Almost 80 people packed the Global Health Council’s conference room last week, with 63 more listening in online, to learn about new initiatives to strengthen maternal, newborn, and child health by improving nutrition. The briefing was held in conjunction with World Food Day on Oct. 16.

Officials from the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) described the intersecting nutrition goals of the U.S. government’s Feed the Future and Global Health Initiatives, while representatives of two global health organizations spoke about how new approaches to reducing malnutrition and under-nutrition are being carried out on the ground.

 

The Global Health Initiative (GHI), with its plans for integrated programs across the spectrum of infectious diseases, maternal and child health, family planning and health systems, seems like it was designed specifically to meet Guatemala’s challenges.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version
Subscribe to RSS - MNCH