leadership & management

This blog post was co-written with Morsi Mansour. Joan and Morsi are leadership development specialists in MSH’s Center for Leadership and Management.

Students in Uganda participate in a leadership development program during their pre-service medical training.

How can we empower the front-line of health care managers and service providers in the developing world?

As the Leadership, Management and Sustainability Program completes five years, it is an important moment to sum up what we have learned about sustainability and to reflect on how local ownership of health improvement programs supports sustainability of health results.

Over 33 million people are currently living with HIV & AIDS throughout the world. Despite great strides in slowing the epidemic, there remains a stunning gap in prevention, care, and treatment efforts. This is especially true for most-at-risk-populations, which include commercial sex workers (CSWs) and their clients, injecting drug users (IDUs), men who have sex with men (MSM), and prisoners. People in these risk groups are so stigmatized and discriminated against in many countries that it becomes extremely difficult – sometimes impossible – to provide them with much-needed HIV prevention, care and treatment services. Even more, MARP behaviors often are illegal, which then compromises needed action and support from government authorities.

Denial of such basic human rights as access to prevention, care, and treatment for the most-at-risk-populations is unacceptable. It leaves those most in need underserved and severely marginalized. As World AIDS Day 2010 approaches with this year’s message of “Universal access and human rights,” I am reflecting on the specialized HIV interventions that MSH helps provide to most-at-risk populations.

Danielle Brown is the Program Coordinator of the Leadership, Management and Sustainability (LMS) project in Haiti. She worked with our teams in Haiti from October 24 – November 14.

River Crossers at Rivií¨re des Barres

 

Blog post also appeared on Global Health Magazine.

PEPFAR Fellow in the field

As the country with the second highest maternal mortality rate in the world, outranked only by India, Nigeria loses one in every 18 women during child-birth. The country also has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world, one of the lowest life expectancy rates---estimated at 47 years---and the second largest population of people living with HIV & AIDS, with only 30% of people eligible for anti-retroviral treatment able to access these life-saving drugs.

The Health Minister’s Conference for member countries of The East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community (ECSA HC) was opened by the Minister of Health, Zimbabwe in Harare on October 25. The theme, "Moving from Knowledge to Action: Harnessing Evidence to Transform Healthcare" is very relevant to the mission of Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

I’ll highlight two sessions from the first day that support the evolving global health field and the work of MSH.

 

The Global Health Initiative (GHI), with its plans for integrated programs across the spectrum of infectious diseases, maternal and child health, family planning and health systems, seems like it was designed specifically to meet Guatemala’s challenges.

Blog post originally appeared on Global Health Magazine.

Six years ago the Malawi health system was on the verge of collapse due to severe shortages of health workers. Every year the College of Medicine would train 20 doctors and every year, half of them would leave the country. Nurses were overwhelmed by the demand for services.

At a time when many are looking for examples of lasting local success in international development and sustainable approaches to healthcare for low income populations, PROSALUD, Bolivia’s largest health nongovernmental organization (NGO), embodies this success.  PROSALUD just celebrated its 25th anniversary last week – and MSH was there to help celebrate. For over two decades, PROSALUD has contributed to the unmet health needs of low-income populations in Bolivia, working with the active participation of the communities it serves.

It is always very special to witness an idea blossom, a theory carried out in practice, a vision becoming a reality. Such occasions are all too rare and when you’re in one, you really feel like you are living a special moment in history.

Ron O’Connor, Founder of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and I had this very distinct opportunity two weeks ago in Santa Cruz, Bolivia as we were honored to attend the 25th Anniversary Celebration of PROSALUD.  Over the last 25 years, MSH has been privileged to accompany PROSALUD in its successful journey from one small clinic dependent on outside donations to become one of Bolivia’s primer health care providers with 23 health centers and 5 clinics in 9 cities across the country. And, PROSALUD is financially independent and governed by its own Bolivian Board of Directors.

Pick up any American newspaper these days, and all of the stories coming out of Haiti are negative: earthquake relief work is going slow, displaced people are still living in tented camps, men and women are still struggling to find work.  And while these facts can’t be disputed, there are many other stories that are being left untold.  Working in Haiti earlier this month, I encountered six women who are on the front lines of the battle against Haiti’s HIV & AIDS epidemic, who shared their stories with me.

Women in Haiti

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