Leadership Development Program

GNU Fellow Marzila Mashal (far right) of Afghanistan attends Leadership Development Program in Egypt

Editor’s Note: Marzila Mashal, an Administrative Coordinator working in Kabul, Afghanistan, was awarded a month long fellowship that is awarded to two MSH staffers each year. The Fellowship was established in honor of Carmen Urdaneta, Amy Lynn Niebling, and Cristi Gadue who on February 3, 2005, died in a plane crash outside Kabul, Afghanistan. The Gadue-Niebling-Urdaneta (GNU) Memorial Fund was established to further the work to which these remarkable women dedicated their lives. Each year, the GNU Fellowship provides MSH employees based in the US and the field with an international public health opportunity at another MSH location.

Guest post by Dr. Ahmad Masoud Rahmani

Dr. Ahmad Masoud Rahmani is the National Director of the Afghanistan National Blood Safety and Transfusion Services Directorate, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Dr. Masoud was a participant in the MSH Leadership Development Program offered by the USAID-funded Technical Support to the Central and Provincial Ministry of Public Health project (Tech-Serve) in Afghanistan last year. 

The National Blood Transfusion service in Afghanistan has the responsibility for ensuring that a safe and adequate blood supply is available for all people who need it. This is a free service to all citizens of Afghanistan as mandated by our parliament. Yet to us the costs of providing one pint of blood is very high, about $30 per unit. This includes the cost of consumables, testing of blood, refreshments to blood donors, and the cost of supporting staff and services. For Afghanistan, a country devastated by internal strife and war, this is a very high burden to carry by the Ministry of Public Health.

A nurse communicates with a patient with sign language. 

In the kidney dialysis unit of Kom Ombo District Hospital in Upper Egypt, dedicated nurses prepare for the monthly treatment of a regular patient. They have assured the proper functioning of medical equipment, stocked the dialysis room with necessary supplies, and prepared staff for the dialysis process. However, the patient is missing.

Strong leadership, governance, and management are the cornerstones of successful global, national, and local efforts to save lives and achieve the  maximum impact from health investments. Yet effective leadership, management, and governance skills and practices too often are the vital missing elements in public, civil society and even private health organizations. Fortunately, these skills can be developed. They are best developed working in teams, in one’s own setting, over time, while facing real challenges.

With our partners, MSH works to build capacity at all levels within public and private organizations to improve leadership and management practices. Improved capacity ensures sound governance policies, creates a work climate that supports staff motivation, increases flexibility, and realigns staff to focus on common, achievable objectives.

Simi Grewal is the Program Coordinator for Health Systems Strengthening and Results Management at MSH. She worked as a fellow in Egypt from January 16-February 5.

Introduction

by Joan Bragar Mansour, ED.D, leadership development specialist at MSH.

Dr. Morsi Mansour is an Egyptian surgeon and Leadership Development Specialist for MSH who teaches leadership to health professionals and develops leadership facilitators around the world. He was in Tahrir Square for two weeks during the uprising in Egypt and shares his experience below.

In Egypt, there has been a Leadership Development Program since 2002. Using their own local resources, health workers unified in over 184 health units across the Aswan governorate in Egypt focused on reducing maternal mortality and succeeded in reducing it from 85/100,000 to 35/100,000 in two years.

Ryan Cherlin, USAID, wrote this blog after a recent visit to Haiti. This blog post was originally posted on USAID's IMPACT Blog.

A woman holds one of the USAID hygiene kits at a Cholera Treatment Center on Thursday, Oct. 28, in Verrettes in the Artibonite department of Haiti. The center, run by USAID partner International Medical Corps, opened earlier this week.

 

When a Haitian says, Dí¨yí¨  mí²n gen  mí²n, they mean to say, as you solve one problem there is always another that must also be solved.

Driving through the densely populated city of Port-au-Prince I wondered how many times this old proverb was the subject of conversation this past year.

In the months following the earthquake in early January 2010, Haitians endured the devastating effects of hurricane Tomas, political instability and violence stemming from a presidential election, and a cholera epidemic.

Prior to January 12, 2010, Management Sciences for Health’s Leadership, Management and Sustainability Program was working with Haiti’s Ministry of Public Health and Population to build capacity in several areas:  family planning and reproductive health; commodity management and security; coordinating HIV & AIDS awareness and community mobilization activities; and leadership development.

But after the terrible earthquake of one year ago, we who normally promote leadership in the health sector were faced with our own leadership challenges:  how to continue to lead and manage our program effectively during an ongoing crisis, and most importantly, how to ensure continued help to those who rely on LMS support. Our immediate priority:  dealing with the collapse and destruction of our office.  For months, we worked out of large tent constructed next to the LMS warehouse, a reminder everyday that many of those we were serving had been forced to move into temporary shelters.  

Women Nurses at Results Presentation in Aswan, Egypt

In Aswan, Egypt’s sunniest southern city located about one and a half hours by plane from Cairo, the Nile is at its most striking. Tropical plants grow along the edges of the flowing river, and the amber desert and granite rocks surround orchards of palm trees.

I was honored to be present in Aswan during one of Management Sciences for Health’s most important events; the results presentation of the Leadership Development Program (LDP), funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) as part of the Improving the Performance of Nurses in Upper Egypt (IPN) project in the Aswan governorate.

Health Workers in Southern Sudan

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to visit Southern Sudan. For over five decades, Southern Sudan endured civil war, unrest, and several waves of forced displacement and refugees. The infrastructure of nearly every sector was mostly destroyed throughout the region. It is a classic fragile state situation.

Since the Comprehensive Peace Agreement was signed five years ago, the Government of Southern Sudan, donors, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, private organizations, and, most importantly, health workers are coming together to rebuild a shattered health system.

Now the global community focuses attention on Southern Sudan as they prepare for a Referendum vote to decide if they will officially break away from Northern Sudan to become an independent state. The vote is scheduled to begin January 9, 2011.

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