Kenya

Integrating the Leadership Development Program into Guyana's national nursing school training (watch video): Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention, phase two (GHARP II), a PEPFAR-funded and USAID-supported project.

Developing Strong Health Leaders Saves Lives, the newest edition of MSH's Global Health Impact e-newsletter (subscribe), features:

Mary Ngari, Permanent Secretary of Kenya’s Ministry of Medical Services, addresses conference attendees on the first day. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

In my 35 years working in international health, I've attended hundreds of conferences. Conferences are opportunities to exchange ideas and form connections. They’re often fascinating. But once in a while a conference itself can be a pivotal moment. A great example was last year’s International AIDS Conference, the first held in the United States after President Obama finally lifted the longstanding travel ban against foreigners living with HIV.

And recently, people around MSH, and throughout the Kenya health community, have been talking about Kenya’s First National Conference on Health Leadership, Management and Governance. The conference, held in early February, demonstrated the long-term vision of the Kenyans who are running the health system. These leaders understand the value of training health systems managers to improve the quality of service delivery.

Conference attendees were still full of energy on the final day of Kenya’s First National Conference on Health Leadership, Management and Governance. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

After a very busy week scurrying around behind the scenes at Kenya’s First National Conference on Health Leadership, Management and Governance, the staff of the USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability project in Kenya (LMS/Kenya) gathered on Friday morning before the start of the fourth and final day. Generally, the last day of a conference is filled with summaries and closing-day formalities. But this time, Project Director Karen Caldwell informed us that we still had one essential task ahead. Our challenge was to assist the more than 250 participants to articulate, with a common voice, a clear and actionable “Way Forward” based on all of the rich and complex discussions of the many sessions, skills-building workshops, and networking meetings that had occurred during the past week. This is critical as Kenya is transitioning to a new health sector governance structure that will give responsibility for service delivery to the county-level authorities; for many conference attendees it was their first opportunity to discuss how they can shape and support this process.

Maria Francisco, USAID, with guest speakers from Ethiopia, Dr. N. Kedir Bilal, and Ghana, Dr. Elias Sory. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Today, in Nairobi, Kenya, we’re celebrating the opening of the First National Conference on Health Leadership, Management and Governance, a joint undertaking of the Ministry of Medical Services and the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation with support from Management Sciences for Health through the USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability Project in Kenya (LMS/Kenya).

By coincidence, it also marks the second anniversary of my own arrival in Kenya to assume responsibilities as the communications specialist on the LMS/Kenya project. In these past two years, I've seen the “buzz” about leadership and management in the health sector grow into a virtual shout. This conference is the culmination of a steady and persistent push to strengthen health leadership and management capacity in Kenya which started long before I came here.

Jane Briggs of the USAID-funded SIAPS program at MSH gives examples from Rwanda and Kenya during the Improving Access to Essential Maternal Health Medicines session on the first day of the conference. {Photo credit: C. Lander / MSH.}Photo credit: C. Lander / MSH.

Cross-posted from the SIAPS website.

“Respectful maternal care was said to be more than just a means to an end, and can be framed as several issues: human rights, quality of care, equity and public health,” Jocalyn Clark, senior editor of PLoS Medicine, noted about the final day of the 2013 Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC).

The conference brought together scientists, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to share knowledge, ideas, innovations, research, programs and policies on maternal health quality and access, among several other topics. Participants also worked on building progress towards reducing and eliminating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity.

Quality of maternal care was a consistent theme throughout the conference.

Health for All.Health for All.

The October edition of MSH's Global Health Impact newsletter (subscribe), features stories of people, communities, and countries on the road toward universal health coverage (UHC).

The vital role of the essential package for health impact

On the Road to Universal Health Coverage: The Vital Role of the Essential Package for Health Impact

Esther manages commodity supplies with meticulous record keeping {Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.

This is the advice that Esther Wahome, a registered community health nurse in a Kenyan health facility, gives to her clients when they come to the tuberculosis (TB) clinic. Within a short time, Esther dispenses the drugs to the patient, provides health care advice and updates her records.

Esther’s TB clinic clients are usually referred to Kayole II sub-district hospital from Toto Bora and other smaller health care centers. Kayole II, located on the outskirts of Nairobi, provides free health services and receives nearly 300 outpatients each day.

During a routine supervisory visit conducted by the USAID-funded, MSH-led, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) Program, Esther, a mother of two, spoke about her work at the Kayole II TB Clinic, which she has been running for the last three months.

“I like serving in the TB clinic because I get to see patients who are weak regain their strength. Sometimes the patients come in when they are so weak and close to skin and bones that at times I wonder where to inject them. Seeing patients thrive fulfills me and is my joy,” says a smiling Esther.

Women meeting in Senegal. {Photo credit: Galdos/MSH.}Photo credit: Galdos/MSH.

Good governance in health care matters at all levels of the health system—from communities to health facilities to governments. When a community HIV & AIDS association in Zanzibar grew from 40 members to more than 1,000, it needed better governance. When women in Senegal raised concerns about lack of privacy and poor security at a district hospital, it needed better governance. And when the national health insurance program in Kenya was underperforming even after efforts to address its management and leadership, it too needed better governance.

Until recently, governance was arguably the most tenacious but unspoken barrier to achieving widespread, large-scale, sustainable health impact. In the 1990s, global health programs focused on training health managers. In the 2000s, as management improved and the need for stronger leaders became evident, the focus expanded to leadership development. By now, we’ve developed robust practices for building the capacity of health managers and leaders at all levels of country health systems.

Voices of TB participants (from left): David Rochkind (moderator); Rachel Urduno (Mexico/Texas); Andre Gariseb (Namibia); Pham Thu Hoa (Vietnam); Francis Apina (Kenya); Rosalie and Faith Stephson (Philippines/Texas); Endalkachew Fekadu Demmisse (Ethiopia). {Photo credit: Claire Moodie/MSH.}Photo credit: Claire Moodie/MSH.

Cross-posted on TB-CARE I.

World TB Day, March 24th, was commemorated in many countries around the world last week to acknowledge the accomplishments made in the fight against tuberculosis (TB), and to call attention to the work that still needs to be done.

Voices of TB, a unique event organized by USAID, featured former TB patients speaking about their personal fight against TB. Survivors of TB from Ethiopia, Kenya, Namibia and Vietnam --- four TB CARE I-supported countries --- and from the United States, spoke at the event on March 22 in Washington, D.C.

Inside Story: The Science of HIV/AIDSInside Story: The Science of HIV/AIDS

Kalu, a young man from Kenya, dreamed of becoming a star footballer (soccer player). Little did he know when he traveled to South Africa to pursue his dream that he carried in him a hidden passenger: the HIV virus. And little did he know that his forbidden romance with Ify, the coach’s daughter, would spread the virus, infecting her with HIV.

Presented by Discovery Channel Global Education Partnerships (DCGEP) and produced by Curious Pictures, Inside Story: The Science of HIV/AIDS is a modern tale of young love with false accusations, heartbreak and ultimately reconciliation. Inside Story is an African sports drama, with team rivalries, individual jealousies and xenophobia. In its most creative dimension, Inside Story is a masterful and pioneering AIDS education vehicle with sophisticated animated clips that show the science of HIV including the virus infecting cells.

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