health systems

Health Workers in Southern Sudan

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to visit Southern Sudan. For over five decades, Southern Sudan endured civil war, unrest, and several waves of forced displacement and refugees. The infrastructure of nearly every sector was mostly destroyed throughout the region. It is a classic fragile state situation.

Since the Comprehensive Peace Agreement was signed five years ago, the Government of Southern Sudan, donors, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, private organizations, and, most importantly, health workers are coming together to rebuild a shattered health system.

Now the global community focuses attention on Southern Sudan as they prepare for a Referendum vote to decide if they will officially break away from Northern Sudan to become an independent state. The vote is scheduled to begin January 9, 2011.

At this First Global Symposium on Health Systems Research there have been a number of concurrent sessions on how best to make the link between research and decision-making. How do we make research relevant and timely so that it can inform policy-making?

MSH served as a panelist on the panel “Health systems and national policy-making: Strengthening the Connection,” which provided good examples of studies from Nigeria and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region that provided insight into this gap.

In Nigeria, a study focused on how the gap between policy makers and researchers could be bridged. How can research be made attractive so policy makers desire it? Through a cross-sectional survey, they set out to improve the skills of policy makers in evidence-informed policy making. A platform was created where the two met on neutral ground to develop the research agenda. What came out of this collaboration were five skill building workshops where pre/post data was collected. There was much participation and enthusiasm by both parties which culminated in six policy briefs to improve health systems operation in Nigeria.

Blog post also appeared on Global Health Magazine.

PEPFAR Fellow in the field

As the country with the second highest maternal mortality rate in the world, outranked only by India, Nigeria loses one in every 18 women during child-birth. The country also has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world, one of the lowest life expectancy rates---estimated at 47 years---and the second largest population of people living with HIV & AIDS, with only 30% of people eligible for anti-retroviral treatment able to access these life-saving drugs.

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