Haiti

On Saturday, October 23, a four-member group from the Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité (SDSH) project, led by MSH’s Dr. Patrick Dimanche, conducted an initial on-the-ground assessment and provided support for five local NGO partners---Service and Development Agency (SADA) in Mattheux/West Department, Saint-Paul Health Center in Montrouis/West Department, Pierre Payen Health Center in Pierre Payen/Lower Artibonite Department, Hospital Albert Schweitzer/Lower Artibonite Department, and Claire Heureuse Community Hospital/Upper Artibonite Department---that have cared for over a third of the 2,364 cases reported thus far. Ninety-eight of the reported 208 deaths have occurred in four of these five health facilities.

The three USAID-funded projects managed by MSH in Haiti---SDSH, Leadership, Management, and Sustainability (LMS), and the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) project---are working together to deliver emergency commodities including bed sheets, towels, adult diapers, disposable gloves, oral rehydration salts, IV solution, water treatment tablets, and soap.

Yesterday the Direction of Civil Protection and Disaster in Haiti confirmed a cholera outbreak in two departments (districts) of the country resulting in 1,498 cases managed in health facilities and 135 cholera related deaths.

The USAID-funded, MSH-led Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haíïti (SDSH) project is working closely with Haiti’s Ministry of Health and other local and international partners to coordinate a community-level response to the cholera outbreak.

SDSH is mobilizing its established network of over 4,000 community-based health workers to reach Haiti’s largely rural population. The project is working with local and international vendors to procure oral rehydration solutions, a critical component of first aid for diarrheal disease.

For more details reported by SDSH on the ground, see our press release from earlier today.

Pick up any American newspaper these days, and all of the stories coming out of Haiti are negative: earthquake relief work is going slow, displaced people are still living in tented camps, men and women are still struggling to find work.  And while these facts can’t be disputed, there are many other stories that are being left untold.  Working in Haiti earlier this month, I encountered six women who are on the front lines of the battle against Haiti’s HIV & AIDS epidemic, who shared their stories with me.

Women in Haiti

Originally posted on Global Health TV's website.

Watch Video Coverage of Dispelling Myths About Haiti

The Global Health Council and its partners held a press conference at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna, to bring the attention of the media back to Haiti six months after it was devastated by earthquake.

Experts such as Dr. Paul Farmer, Dr. Jonathan Quick from Management Sciences for Health, Jeff Sturchio from the Global Health Council, and Dr. Jean William Pape from GHESKIO discuss the struggles and successes being made in the troubled nation - and try to dispel a few myths too.

As we have heard, Haiti is the poorest country in Western Hemisphere and has some of the worst health statistics. Many things did not work well before the earthquake and the recovery effort has not progressed as many had hoped.

There is a perception among some, though, that nothing was working before the January 12th earthquake and that nothing has happened since.

Certainly in the health sector, and specifically in AIDS, this perception is simply wrong. The earthquake has been devastating for Haiti and its people, but in the health sector there were many good things going on before the earthquake and some real strengths to build upon. The government of Haiti, at both the national and department level, has been playing a strong leadership role.

MSH first began working in Haiti over 30 years ago. Over the last decade our nearly all-Haitian staff has worked intensively to develop leadership, management, planning, and service delivery skills within the Ministry of Health and Population, nationally and at the departmental and local levels. We also work to strengthen over two dozen service delivery NGOs.

Just over five months ago, Haiti suffered a devastating earthquake that displaced more than 700,000 people.  Addressing the health needs of such a large population in a post-disaster situation is a complex challenge, one Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is supporting through its many programs including our Leadership, Management and Sustainability Program (LMS).

In fragile states, constraints on governments often prevent them from simultaneously building their stewardship role and immediately expanding service delivery. National and local governments must ultimately lead the process and work together with NGOs and the private sector to successfully strengthen their own health systems.

In Haiti, a two-pronged approach was successfully developed and implemented prior to the earthquake by a four-way partnership between the Government of Haiti, the United States Government, a network of Haitian and international NGOs  (Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haíïti) (SDSH), and Management Sciences for Health.

The two-pronged approach included:

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