global health

"On this World Cancer Day, we celebrate the remarkable progress in prevention, detection, care and treatment of cancer. Overall, treatment success has increased dramatically, with survival rates in high income countries like the U.S. now reaching over 90 percent for certain cancers such as breast, prostate, and testicular for patients with access to treatment. But this life-giving progress has yet to reach most of the world's people, who live in developing countries, where over half of new cases and nearly two thirds of all cancer deaths occur. Unforgivably, there is a huge "cancer divide" between rich and poor.

This year's World Cancer Day theme set by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) -- "together it is possible"-- calls on all individuals, organizations and governments to do their part to reduce premature deaths from cancers by 25 percent by 2025.

But there have been four myths that have held back cancer care and control in developing countries. On this World Cancer Day, let's start a global pink revolution to replace the myths with truths and the complacency with action."

MSH's 40th anniversary year has been a catalyst to revisit our origins, recommit to our mission and renew our values. As we approach the holidays and look toward 2012, I’d like to share reflections on one of the most poignant events of the year for me: my recent visit with Mrs. Fumiko Iwamura in Japan. Fumiko-san is the widow of Dr. Noboru Iwamura, who inspired our founder Ron O’Connor to create MSH.

MSH President Jonathan Quick and Fumiko Iwamura. (Japan, 2011) Photo credit: Miho Sato.

 

The 16th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections (ICASA) opened today, December 5, 2011, at the newly refurbished Millennium Hall in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, with a colorful and lively music and dance production by the Ethiopian National Theatre and Traditional Music Group and the Addis Ababa Youth & Children’s Theatre.

UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé at the 16th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA). Credit: UNAIDS/J.Ose.

UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé gave an impassioned welcome speech remembering the last 30 years of AIDS and the 24 million African lives lost to the epidemic. He called for solidarity and compassion for the 34 million people currently living with HIV.

We know how to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. But without intervention nearly 40 percent of mothers with HIV/AIDS in developing countries will transmit the virus to their newborns.

The future is indeed bright for public health in Nigeria, judging from what Dr. Muhammad Ali Pate, the Honorable Minister of State for Health of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, said at the Africare House in Washington, D.C. on September 21. The event, Innovative Approaches to Expanding Health Care Services, was co-sponsored by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), fhi360, the Anadach Group, and hosted by Africare.

Lucia Afiki and Esther Goodson are living positively with HIV. They are counselors for family planning and HIV & AIDS at Salima District Hospital in Malawi, where they openly tell their clients that they are HIV-positive. “When we are open with them about our status,” says Afiki, “people say, ‘Come closer, we want to learn from you.’” Goodson adds: “They say, ‘What should I do to look as good as you?’” The counselors tell them to visit a doctor and join a support group. This is an approach that saves lives. It also transforms social norms about health and gender.

Discovering MSH blog series graphicOver the next couple of months, as MSH celebrates it's 40th anniversary, reporter John Donnelly and photographer Dominic Chavez will be traveling to several countries to report on MSH’s work in the field. The stories will go into a book due out in the fall on MSH’s 40 years in global health. This blog entry is a post from the road, to give a flavor of their experiences with MSH staff.

Dr. John P. Rumunu, MSH’s Chief of Party in South Sudan. © Dominic Chavez

 

Yesterday the results of HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052, a clinical trial funded by the National Institutes for Health, offered definitive proof of what we have long suspected---that treating HIV infected persons substantially reduces the risk of transmitting HIV to uninfected persons.

This is FANTASTIC news and offers very convincing evidence that, at least for heterosexual discordant couples (the study was not able to enroll significant numbers of gay men), if the infected person is on ART, the uninfected partner is protected. And more broadly, it offers significant evidence that treatment is indeed highly effective in preventing transmission of HIV. This can reasonably be described as a “game changer” with respect to how we think about HIV prevention, care, and treatment. We used to talk about “treatment as prevention,” but now we can say “treatment IS prevention.”

Read the UNAIDS report here.

Cynthia Isioma, Nigeria

In the village of Owa Ofie, Nigeria, Cynthia Isioma, a young girl who has survived enormous odds reclaimed her dream of secondary education.

Cynthia lost both parents at the age of two and was left in the care of her grandmother who died three years later. Cynthia’s situation grew more challenging when she was then moved to her blind grandfather’s home at the age of five.

Rather than receive care, Cynthia had to take on the responsibility of caring for her grandfather who could not afford to send her to school.  Cynthia became a child caregiver, providing for herself and her grandpa. Her daily duties included going to the forest to collect cocoyam, palm nuts, snails, and waterleaves to sell and for household use.

Cynthia’s situation changed when she was 13 years old and Rural Linkage Network (RULIN), a community-based organization based in Boji Boji, visited Owa Ofie to identify orphans in need of support. RULIN is supported by the USAID-funded, MSH-led Community Support for OVC Project (CUBS).

Dr. Ronald O'Connor, Founder of MSH, and Marcia Herrera, Director of Talent Management at MSH, co-authored this blog post.

Dr. David Sencer died on Monday, May 2, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia at age 86. He died at Emory University Hospital, due to complications of heart disease.

Dr. Sencer, one of the major twentieth century public health thought leaders, was also one of the rarest: a warm-hearted, modest man of great accomplishments and lifelong dedication to Management Sciences for Health's mission of closing the gap between what is known and what is done to solve important public health problems around the world.

From 1986 until his retirement in 1993, Dr. Sencer was a valued MSH colleague and advisor; he served in the roles of Chief Operating Officer and Senior Fellow. Dr. Sencer led by empowering others; he believed that more could and would be done when leaders put the action, and often the visibility, in the hands of those most directly on the front lines of practical public health action.

Indeed, Dr. Sencer was doing it long before MSH was conceived, in a career that spanned many personal and professional challenges: Dr. Sencer overcame tuberculosis as a young physician and went on to lead many important health initiatives and institutions.

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