Family Planning

At a satellite session at the 2011 International Conference on Family Planning on November 30 in Dakar, MSH asked five panelists to discuss successes in family planning, and what still needs to be done. The conversation was moderated by MSH’s Issakha Diallo and held in conjunction with a celebration of MSH’s 40th anniversary.

Over 2,300 delegates, many colorfully dressed, gathered in Dakar, Senegal  at the jam-packed amphitheatre and two exterior tents of Le Meridien President for the start of this week’s 2nd International Family Planning Conference, sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Monica Kerrigan, of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, said that one third of Africans live in francophone Africa, and yet it has been the most neglected area for family planning services. She praised Senegal for hosting the first family planning conference in French-speaking Africa and urged Senegal to use this opportunity to act boldly and make family planning an urgent priority.

Zakia, a nurse in Afghanistan, has become a leader in her health center. After participating in an MSH leadership development program, Zakia led a team of nurses in increasing awareness about family planning, resulting in a doubling of the use of contraceptive pills and an eight-fold increase in the number of condoms distributed in two years. “Everyone here no longer thinks of problems as obstacles in our way, but challenges we must face,” Zakia says.

Jessica Poni is a midwife in Panthou Primary Health Care Center -- the only primary health care center in Aweil South County in Northern Bahr al Ghazal, South Sudan. Panthou Primary Health Care Center is managed locally by the International Rescue Committee (IRC), the implementing partner of the USAID-funded Sudan Health Transformation Project (SHTP II), led by MSH.

Leafing through Malawi’s Nation newspaper, the headline, 'wild men in society escalating rape cases' jumps off the page. I pause and stare at the accompanying photo and caption.

An estimated 400 people gathered in Asram, Togo, to watch a ceremony introducing 250 newly-trained community health workers -- part of the Action for West Africa Region II (AWARE II) project, supported by USAID and led by MSH.

Three decades ago, life in the lakeside village of Zambo was calm.

"Leading a community to become healthy is not just a male thing," says Águida Curo Vican, president of the Local Development Committee of Tutumbaru in Peru’s Ayacucho region.

A couple from Malawi receives counseling from a Community-Based Distribution Agent (CBDA)

In Kasungu District, Malawi, trained Community-Based Distribution Agents (CBDAs) gather for their final and perhaps most challenging training: couples counseling.

With HIV, couples often do not freely discuss issues and concerns. “Where communication has been a problem for couples, CBDAs in underserved areas will help in risk reduction,” explains Jane Ngwira, MSH’s Kasungu District Coordinator.

From Alima Twaibu’s village in Nhkotakota district, it is 10 km to the nearest Health Center or 16 km to the District Hospital. With more than 80% of the population living in rural areas, the majority of Malawians experience similar challenges to accessing care. People have to walk long distances to receive services when they are sick. And when time away from work or paying for transport competes with other basic expenses, the decision to seek preventive services like family planning and HIV testing and counseling (HTC) is even more difficult. Fortunately for her neighbors and surrounding communities, Alima is an experienced Community-Based Distribution Agent (CBDA).

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