Ethiopia

Alime, a patient featured in MSH's Medicine Movers

by Devex's Noa Gutterman and Management Sciences for Health

This summer, Devex partnered with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) to host Access to Medicines (), a conversation that has analyzed and amplified the discussion on global access to medicines.

Over the last three weeks,  has examined major questions including: 

Aster, a grandmother living with diabetes and TB, invited MSH to accompany her on a visit to the pharmacy at the local hospital in Debre Markos, Ethiopia.

written by Daphne Northrop, video by Emily Judem

How do you ensure that patients get the medicine they need -- at the right dose, when they need it, no matter the circumstances?

Answering that question became the foundation of an enduring partnership between Management Sciences for Health (MSH), USAID, and country governments around the world. Over the past 30 years, as a result of that partnership, countries have made monumental progress in building the systems that move medicines to their final destination: the people who need them.

Medicine Movers, a new microsite by MSH, tells the stories of patients who continue to benefit from these pharmaceutical systems, launched during the peak of the AIDS epidemic.

 {Photo credit: Matthew Martin/MSH}Mark R. Dybul, executive director of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, expressed enthusiastic support for strategies combating epidemics in his keynote address.Photo credit: Matthew Martin/MSH

The No More Epidemics campaign convened a multi-sectoral panel on “Advancing the Global Health Security Agenda” at the 69th World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland on May 25, 2016. Keynote speaker, Mark Dybul, MD, Executive Director of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, expressed enthusiastic support for strategies combating epidemics. Dybul emphasized the importance of community level engagement in infectious disease preparedness and response, stressing that interventions cannot end at a health clinic, they must continue on to the “last mile”.

The panel was comprised of H.E. Kesetebirhan Admasu, MD, Minister of Health, Ethiopia; H.E. Aníbal Velasquez Valdivia, MD, Minister of Health, Peru; H.E. Elioda Tumwesigye, MD, Minister of Health, Uganda; as well as David Barash, MD, Chief Medical Officer, GE Foundation; and Minister Renne Klinge, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Finland to Geneva.

The discussion, moderated by MSH President and CEO, Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH, highlighted the need to ensure that epidemic prevention, preparedness and response capabilities are sustainable under the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA).

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

Today, April 7, we celebrate World Health Day, started by the World Health Organization (WHO) to mark its founding in 1948.

Amid Ebola, Zika, maternal and child mortality, and other global health challenges, WHO chose diabetes, for the first time, as its World Health Day theme (“Stay super. Beat diabetes”).  To urge global action on the rising diabetes burden, WHO released a new global report yesterday, April 6, highlighting key global diabetes findings, country profiles, and recommendations to reach the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3.4, which calls on countries to reduce premature death from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including diabetes, by 30 percent by 2030. 

Caren Wakoli, member of the East Africa Women's Mentoring Network, presents at the International Conference on Family Planning. (Photo: Sarah McKee/MSH)Caren Wakoli, member of the East Africa Women's Mentoring Network, presents at the International Conference on Family Planning. (Photo: Sarah McKee/MSH)

And a happy International Women’s Day to you too. Every year, on March 8, activists, organizations, and officials celebrate advancements in women’s rights; however, despite global advocacy and action, women continue to suffer a disproportionate burden of disease and death.

If health systems are expected to deliver responsive and high-quality health services that can end preventable child and maternal deaths, then governments, organizations, and leaders must first address women’s continued underrepresentation in health leadership, management, and governance.

Frankly put, expanding women’s health leadership requires a health system-wide approach that collaborates with individuals, organizations, and governments. For the LMG Project, this means building individual women’s leadership capacity, highlighting the importance of women in health governance, and mainstreaming gender at all levels of a health system.

 {Photo credit: Brigid Boettler/MSH}Expert panelists discuss MDR-TB (from left): Joshua Michaud, Kaiser Family Foundation; Alexander Golubkov, USAID; Muluken Melese, MSH, Ethiopia; and Kenneth Mutesasira, MSH, Uganda.Photo credit: Brigid Boettler/MSH

“When we started our project in 2011, there was no system in place to identify multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB),” explained Muluken Melese, project director for the Help Ethiopia Address the Low Tuberculosis Performance (HEAL TB) project. However, since then, the five-year USAID-funded project, implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), has expanded access to TB services to over half the population of Ethiopia and led a 15-fold increase in the number of MDR-TB patients on treatment.

 {Photo: MSH/Ashleigh Cooper}Panelists (from left) Jemal Mohammed, Director, Leadership Management and Governance Project, MSH; Tarek Rabah, Area Vice President, Middle East and Africa, Astra-Zeneca; and H.E. Dr. Kestebirhan Admasu, Minister of Health, Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia; and moderator Jeffrey Sturchio, CEO, Rabin Martin; at the Future of Health in Africa session.Photo: MSH/Ashleigh Cooper

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) joined more than 1,000 attendees, including global and local businesses and governments, at the Corporate Council on Africa (CCA)’s 10th Biennial US-Africa Business Summit, hosted in partnership with the African Union and the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, in Addis Ababa, this week. Established in 1993 to promote business and investment between the US and nations of Africa, CCA serves as a neutral, trusted intermediary connecting its members with essential government and business leaders. MSH joined the CCA as a member for the first time this year. Representatives from MSH Ethiopia and the US attended the summit.

Healthcare is growing and changing rapidly in Africa, and the demand for quality healthcare is creating opportunities for business investment and engagement. The Summit's Health track focused on the transition from the Millennium Development Goals to the Sustainable Development Goals; how public/private partnerships between businesses, NGOs, and governments can address the challenges and opportunities; and the importance of building resilient health systems and healthy workforces.  

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

This blog post is a web-formatted version of the Global Health Impact newsletter: Stronger Health Systems Stop TB and Save Lives (December 2015). (View or share the email version here.) We welcome your feedback and questions in the comments or email us. On social media, use hashtag and tag .  Subscribe

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia

My home region of Tigray in northern Ethiopia has made great strides in ending preventable maternal mortality. Best estimates suggest that the maternal mortality ratio in our region dropped from approximately 653 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990, to 267 in 2014. However, while most pregnant women in Tigray attend at least one antenatal care visit, only 41 percent attend the recommended four visits, and less than 63 percent deliver with a skilled birth attendant.

We at Management Sciences for Health (MSH) are always looking for new approaches to support the Government of Ethiopia’s efforts to improve maternal health. We discovered one such approach through communities of practice (COP) -- or what we call technical exchange networks.

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