children's health

{Photo credit: Rui Pires, Ghana}Photo credit: Rui Pires, Ghana

MSH reconfirmed its commitment to ending childhood deaths due to diarrhea and pneumonia by renewing its endorsement of the Declaration on Scaling Up Treatment of Diarrhea and Pneumonia (PDF).

MSH has a long history of acting on two of the areas specifically outlined in the declaration, namely promoting "access to affordable, high-quality, over-the-counter ORS and zinc products and/or access to and rational use of amoxicillin in both public and private sectors" and supporting "sustained demand creation to increase awareness of use for diarrhea and/or pneumonia treatments, including teaching caregivers when and where to seek treatment and improving knowledge and skills of health providers to promote and deliver appropriate treatment and care."

We know what works to save the lives of children under five years old: We know which antibiotic to give for treating pneumonia, for example. Yet only 31% of children with suspected pneumonia receive antibiotics. And two million children die from pneumonia and diarrhea each year.

{Photo credit: Katy Doyle / MSH.}Photo credit: Katy Doyle / MSH.

Stop TB in my lifetime.

This global call to action---the Stop TB Partnership's theme for March 24, World TB Day 2013---is as relevant now as it was over a hundred years ago.

Progress toward reducing the global burden of tuberculosis (TB) has been impressive in recent years: TB mortality has fallen by 41 percent since 1990.

Yet, TB remains one of the world’s leading causes of death, killing more than 1.4 million people per year, including 70,000 children. In 2011, 600,000 people died of TB in Africa alone---including many people with HIV.

Low detection rates, new strains of multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB), high prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection, and risk of TB among diabetes patients---nearly 10 percent of TB cases are linked to diabetes, add to the challenge of TB control, especially among the poor and most vulnerable.

Discovering MSH blog series graphicOver the next couple of months, as MSH celebrates it's 40th anniversary, reporter John Donnelly and photographer Dominic Chavez will be traveling to several countries to report on MSH’s work in the field. The stories will go into a book due out in the fall on MSH’s 40 years in global health. This blog entry is a post from the road, to give a flavor of their experiences with MSH staff.

Blog post updated Dec. 27, 2011.

Taj Bibi learns how to use zinc and oral rehydration salts to treat her child. Photo credit: BASICS/Afghanistan, MSH.

Taj Bibi sits nursing her 5-month-old baby in the kitchen of her home in the village of Sartal in Takhar province in Afghanistan’s north. The room is dark; the only natural light comes from the doorway to the dusty courtyard outside. The sound of her children playing echoes across the small family compound.

Bibi’s first two children died -- one of them from severe diarrhea -- because the family could not afford to take them to the doctor. “Now, if our children get diarrhea or any other illness, I take them to the community health worker,” she said.

Community health workers (CHWs) are the building blocks of the Afghan health system, bringing basic health services to villages across the country.

Providing immunizations to children in Afghanistan.

Many children in Afghanistan can be spared of communicable diseases that can make them ill and even cause death, if they receive routine vaccinations. But in a country of more than 25 million people in a country the size of Texas, where over 80% of the population lives in rural areas, immunizing every child against measles, diphtheria, pertusis (whooping cough), tetanus, and polio is very challenging.

Large scale immunization campaigns have proved helpful, but have been unable to significantly increase and maintain high immunization rates throughout the country.

The US Agency for International Development’s BASICS project (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival), with support from MSH, is working with the Afghan Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and UNICEF to demonstrate in nine districts how an expanded program on immunization (EPI) micro-planning can successfully increase the number of immunized children.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version
Subscribe to RSS - children's health