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 {Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Community Health Workers during a morning of training on the lawn at Rukumo Health Center, Rwanda.Photo credit: Todd Shapera

(This post originally appeared on the WomenDeliver blog.)

Throughout global societies, women’s roles place them at the epicenter of risk from disease outbreaks and epidemics. This is true everywhere, but especially so in poor countries with health systems unprepared to meet the ever-surging demands of a public health emergency.

The interaction between gender roles, disease transmission, and socio-economic stability reach a perilous tipping point in epidemics; failing to address that interaction will result in deficient strategies for outbreak prevention and control, and in massive setbacks for women’s health, and development gains. Unless global health security measures help us understand the impact of emerging diseases on women, nations and the world will remain vulnerable to pandemics.

 {Photo credit: Discovery Learning Alliance}"The Lucky Specials" cast members attend the US premiere in Silver Spring, MD.Photo credit: Discovery Learning Alliance

As the global health community prepares to observe World TB Day on March 24, Discovery Learning Alliance, the nonprofit subsidiary of Discovery Communications, opened “The Lucky Specials” in the U.S., a feature-length film about a small-time band in a dusty town in southern Africa with an important message about health.

Mandla (Oros Mampofu) is a miner by day and plays lead guitar for The Lucky Specials by night. He dreams of making it big in the music industry, but when tragedy strikes, the band, Mandla, and their friend Nkanyiso (Sivenathi Mabuya) struggle to hold everything together.

Woven into the narrative are messages to help audiences understand and respond to one of the world’s biggest killers, tuberculosis, which killed almost two million people worldwide in 2015. That is more people than died from AIDS that year. With a unique fusion of live-action drama and state-of-the-art animation, “The Lucky Specials” reveals the unseen world of TB from the inside out.

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

MSH will host and support events in five countries this week to honor World TB Day.

Observed March 24, World TB Day raises awareness and mobilizes support for efforts around the world working to end tuberculosis (TB). The World Health Organization (WHO) has designated this year’s theme as “Unite to End TB: Leave No One Behind,” and many of the day’s activities will focus on addressing stigma, discrimination, and marginalization.

MSH has been a leader in strengthening health systems to fight against TB since 1999 and is working with partners in 22 countries to prevent the spread of the disease and improve the lives of those affected by it.

In Afghanistan, the Challenge TB project — funded by USAID  — will lead 20 awareness events in five cities and will deliver messaging about TB in schools and health facilities. The project will also lead conferences in three provinces, focusing on successful interventions like Urban Directly Observed Treatment and the TB Information System.

The Challenge TB project will also lead World TB Day activities in 11 districts in Bangladesh, ranging from orientations and discussions with workers, to programs at schools, to rallies, to a “sputum collection camp” at an outreach center.

{Women in Malawi are increasingly engaging in sustainable ways to grow household income and end poverty, such as village savings and loans groups. (Photo Credit: Feed the Children / Amos Gumulira)}Women in Malawi are increasingly engaging in sustainable ways to grow household income and end poverty, such as village savings and loans groups. (Photo Credit: Feed the Children / Amos Gumulira)

Follow the conversation at the Commission on the Status of Women:

As we prepare to join the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) next week, where the focus will be on women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work, I am reminded of my visit to Malawi last month.

{Fatimata Kané, Project Director of the FCI Program of MSH in Mali.} Photo Credit: Catherine LalondeFatimata Kané, Project Director of the FCI Program of MSH in Mali.

(Français)

Putting a child on the earth is a whole different type of work. Not everyone can guide a woman and her baby safely through pregnancy and childbirth.

I know what it means to keep women and babies alive and healthy because I am a midwife.

As a young girl in Mali, I passed the village dispensary on my way to school every day. I felt sorry for the people lined up outside waiting for treatment for their illnesses. I always told myself that one day I would wear the white coat of health workers and help those who are sick. During my health education training, I studied midwifery because I wanted to educate, advise and assist women before, during, and after pregnancy. 

Although I stopped practicing midwifery in maternity wards, I apply my professional passion to my work with MSH. No matter where I am or what project I’m working on, I speak with midwives, visit community health centers, and counsel pregnant women about their health and about that of their children whenever I can. When I visit communities, I encourage women to go to their local clinics for prenatal exams and to breastfeed and vaccinate their babies.

{Photo Credit: Catherine Lalonde}Fatimata Kané, directrice du programme FCI de MSH au Mali.Photo Credit: Catherine Lalonde

(English)

Mettre un enfant au monde est tout un travail différent. Tout le monde peut aider quelqu'un qui est malade, mais tout le monde ne peut pas faire le travail d'une sage-femme--guider une femme et son bébé en toute sécurité pendant la grossesse et l'accouchement. Je sais ce que signifie garder les femmes et les bébés vivants et en bonne santé parce que je suis une sage-femme.

Comme une jeune fille, le chemin de mon école passait à côté du dispensaire de mon village ou je voyais les malades attendre les soins. J'avais vraiment pitié d'eux et je me disais toujours qu'il faille que je porte la blouse blanche tenue portée par les agents de santé au Mali afin de venir au secours des malades. Au niveau de l'école de la santé, j'ai bien voulu faire les études de Sage-Femme qui est un métier noble. Une Sage-Femme éduque, conseille et aide les femmes avant, pendant et après les grossesses. La Sage- Femme surveille et aide les femmes en travail jusqu'à la naissance du bébé. C'est très réconfortant d'aider à donner vie à un bébé.

{Photo Credit: Rebecca Weaver/MSH}Photo Credit: Rebecca Weaver/MSH

This is the last in a series of four stories about how strong health systems improve the health of women and children. It was originally published on Global Health Now's website.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has a chance to save millions of children with an inexpensive grassroots community effort.

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), a country beleaguered by years of civil war, official corruption and mismanagement, and civil apathy, the path to building a strong health system is challenging. One initiative, focused on building up community-level care, has shown success—but without more support from the Congolese government, it might not continue.

{Photo Credit: Francies Hajong/MSH}Photo Credit: Francies Hajong/MSH

This is the third in a series of four stories about how strong health systems improve the health of women and children. 

Every day, approximately 830 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth, and 99 percent of them live in developing countries, according to the World Health Organization. Many of these women – and their babies – could be saved with medicines. However, access to these medicines is often limited in the countries where they are most needed. Sheena Patel, a technical advisor for the MSH-led, USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) project, talks about the program's work in helping to improve access to essential medicines. This story was originally published on the SIAPS website February 23. 

MSH: The health of women and children is critical to the overall health and prosperity of a country—and the world. Can you talk a bit about why?

MSH representatives at the launch meeting of the Quality of Care Network (L-R): Zipporah Kpamor, MSH Nigeria Country Representative; Erik Schouten, Country Lead, MSH Malawi; Grace Mlava, Technical Clinical Director, ONSE Health in Malawi; Rudi Thetard, Project Director of ONSE Health in Malawi; Catharine Taylor, Vice President of the Health Programs Group, and Antoine Ndiaye, Country Lead, Cote D’Ivoire.

This is the second in a series of four stories about how strong health systems improve the health of women and children.

Nine countries, with support from the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations International Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and other partners, launched the Network for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health last week.

The new Network aims to improve the quality of care that mothers and babies receive in health facilities while supporting countries in achieving their targets agreed under the Sustainable Development Goals to end preventable maternal and newborn deaths. 

Despite remarkable progress in improving access to health services proven to reduce maternal and newborn deaths, every year worldwide, 303,000 women die during pregnancy and childbirth, 2.7 million babies die during the first 28 days of life, and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. Most of these deaths could be prevented with quality care during pregnancy and childbirth.

However, the provision of care is uneven within and between countries, and often fails to respect the rights and dignity of those who seek it.

{Photo by: Michael Paydos/MSH}Photo by: Michael Paydos/MSH

This article was originally published on LillyPad, a blog run by the global health care company Eli Lilly, on February 16.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health crisis. In his AMR review, renowned economist Jim O’Neill estimates a loss of US$100 trillion in global productivity by the year 2050 if swift, comprehensive action to fight AMR is not taken. The publication acknowledges multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) as a “cornerstone of the global AMR challenge.”

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