Blog Posts by MSHHealthImpact

DRC. {Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

Millions of girls in developing nations will avoid getting a deadly form of cancer---cervical cancer---due to a major drop in costs for two vaccines against cervical cancer. Merck and GlaxoSmithKline announced May 9 that costs for the vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) would be cut to below $5 per dose.

Over 275,000 women die from cervical cancer per year in poor countries.

Merck’s Gardasil vaccine will cost $4.50 per dose and GlaxoSmithKline’s Cervarix will cost $4.60 per dose. The costs were negotiated through the GAVI Alliance (see infographic).

This is welcome news, with cancers and other chronic diseases becoming one of global health’s biggest challenges, moving towards the post-Millennium Development Goals era.

{Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH}Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH

The world needs healthy mothers.

Giving birth. Caring for a child.

If we only have one story, it is this: We need our mothers.

You can help mothers around the world. Give today in honor or memory of your mom.

We go where the need is greatest: Saving lives and improving health in places like Afghanistan, Haiti, Liberia, and Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Delivering quality medicines where there are no roads or services. Empowering local leaders to save lives. Training skilled health workers -- many of whom are women.

Your gift of $15, $50, $100, or more can help improve the health of mothers around the world.

Working together toward a world where everyone has the opportunity for a healthy life.

Want another way to thank your mom? Add her name to the "Celebrating Moms Worldwide" virtual wall.

Voice of America Interviews Dr. Stephen Macharia: On Tuberculosis in South Sudan (Audio).Voice of America Interviews Dr. Stephen Macharia: On Tuberculosis in South Sudan (Audio).

On the eve of World Tuberculosis Day, Voice of America interviewed Dr. Stephen Macharia, the TB CARE I country director for South Sudan.

During the interview (transcript, PDF), Dr. Macharia discussed the TB epidemic in South Sudan, TB CARE I project achievements, and the way forward for improving funding for TB services and multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) control in fragile states, like South Sudan.

TB CARE I is a USAID-funded project, led by KNCV TB Foundation with partners, including Management Sciences for Health.

Voice of America, the official external broadcast institution of the United States federal government, produces nearly 1,500 hours of news and programs each week for an estimated global audience of 123 million people.

This week’s Lancet returns the spotlight to Option B+, an innovative strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV which was first developed in Malawi with technical assistance from MSH. Four letters respond to the concern that international organizations have too quickly endorsed the Option B+ approach of providing lifelong triple antiretroviral therapy (ART), irrespective of CD4 count, to pregnant women with HIV in high-burden countries.

MSH experts Scott Kellerman, Jonathan Jay and Jonathan Quick argue that “a strong case exists for expanding research on Option B+, but not for impeding countries that pursue it on the basis of available evidence and programmatic experience:”

Overcoming Barriers to Health Care for Women in Afghanistan.Overcoming Barriers to Health Care for Women in Afghanistan.

World Health Worker Week (" href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23WHWW&src=hash" target="_blank">) is April 8-12, 2013. Let's show the world just how much . Watch and share the video, thank a health worker, and donate $10 in honor of a health worker. 

"We realized that educating the community was something we had to focus on," says Madina, a trained Afghan midwife, as she describes involving elders and religious leaders in helping to improve access to family planning and perinatal care for women in Khost province, including one woman who came to the health facility suffering complications from a home birth.

Health workers save lives. What will you do to thank a health worker?

World TB Day celebration in Ghana (2012). {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Sunday, March 24, 2013, is World TB Day, and MSH staff and partners are promoting global efforts to stop TB throughout the week.

Here are highlights from some of our activities around the world:

The Afghanistan TB CARE I team is working with the national TB program (NTP) to conduct celebration events at 290 health facilities and communities in 13 USAID-supported provinces. TB messages will be aired through local telephone companies to approximately one million people throughout the nation. TB CARE I is also identifying and publicly rewarding high-performing health workers.

The Bangladesh SIAPS TB team will participate in a national rally on March 24 with all TB partners and stakeholders within the NTP network, as well as in a press conference, workshop, and scientific session.

Mildred's Story: Treating HIV and Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases.Mildred's Story: Treating HIV and Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases.

Fact or fiction?

  • About 70% of all cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
  • Nearly 30% of cancer deaths could be prevented.
  • Many cancers (such as breast, cervical and colorectal cancer) can be cured, if detected early and treated adequately.
  • Cancers are killing more people in developing countries than HIV & AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Answer? Fact. All of them are true.

Cancer is not only a disease of wealthy and elderly nations. The cancer burden on low- and middle-income countries is vast---and cancer deaths are projected to continue rising, with an estimated 13.1 million deaths in 2030. Living in poverty increases the risk of developing cancer, and dramatically reduces the odds of being treated. For example, 90% of child leukemia patients in the United States survive—but in developing countries, the opposite is true: nearly 90% die.

AIDS 2012AIDS 2012

SESSION DETAILS

While building on the momentum of the UN Summit in September 2011, this satellite recognizes that PLHIV both treated and untreated, suffer from co-morbidities due to chronic NCDS. This satellite will examine the role of chronic NCDs and their link with HIV. More specifically, we will review lessons learned from the AIDS Decade of the 2000s and determine what lessons can be leveraged and applied beyond 2015 in the context of an emerging global burden of chronic NCDs. We will also discuss how we can use this current momentum to re-engineer the primary health care model so that it leads to sustainable, cost-efficient, comprehensive and integrated health systems that facilitate the achievement of universal health coverage for chronic NCDs in lower and middle income countries. Partners include: MSH; Government of Tanzania; Sir George Alleyne (Pan American Health Organization); AMPATH; Harvard and University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Welcoming remarks

  • John Donnelly, United States
  • Dr. Jonathan Quick, United States

Why We Still Need Advocacy for Chronic NCDs Post UN-Summit, How Do We Create Shared Responsibility of This dual Epidemic and Why Here at the AIDS 2012 Conference

Honor your mother, support healthy moms, and help kids reach their 5th birthdays: click the image to donate {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Improving Child Health in Communities and at Home, the April/May 2012 edition of MSH's Global Health Impact newsletter (subscribe), features personal stories about child survival and child health in developing countries.

"Prevention, treatment and care close to the home are keys to saving children's lives," says Dr. Jonathan D. Quick, MSH president & chief executive officer, who blogs about saving children's lives through interventions closer to home, shares his 5th birthday picture, and encourages us to support USAID's 5th Birthday Campaign.

Stories about child survival and child health

The newsletter highlights a number of compelling stories from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Nigeria, and Lesotho.

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