Blog Posts by MSHHealthImpact

For 40 years, MSH has promoted equal access to health care for women by strengthening health systems and building the capacity of women as leaders and managers, technical experts, clinicians, and community health workers. Management Sciences for Health celebrates International Women's Day, March 8, 2011. Meet the women who inspire us.

Last week, the House of Representatives cut the international affairs budget by 20% of the FY 2010 levels. While these are tough times, these cuts are disappointing given investments made in international affairs account for only 1 percent of the overall US Government budget.  More plainly, these cuts affect the poorest and most vulnerable people around the globe.

A recent poll conducted by WorldPublicOpinion.org/Knowledge Networks showed that most Americans support foreign assistance levels up to 10% of the budget.

Furthermore, such small cuts in spending will not solve the deficit problem. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has argued that investments made in development and diplomacy can help deter future needs for resources for defense and that America’s national security depends on the civilian diplomats and aid workers who also risk their lives every day to support our overseas interests.

Ryan Cherlin, USAID, wrote this blog after a recent visit to Haiti. This blog post was originally posted on USAID's IMPACT Blog.

A woman holds one of the USAID hygiene kits at a Cholera Treatment Center on Thursday, Oct. 28, in Verrettes in the Artibonite department of Haiti. The center, run by USAID partner International Medical Corps, opened earlier this week.

 

When a Haitian says, Dí¨yí¨  mí²n gen  mí²n, they mean to say, as you solve one problem there is always another that must also be solved.

Driving through the densely populated city of Port-au-Prince I wondered how many times this old proverb was the subject of conversation this past year.

In the months following the earthquake in early January 2010, Haitians endured the devastating effects of hurricane Tomas, political instability and violence stemming from a presidential election, and a cholera epidemic.

Dr. Florence Guillaume, Deputy Chief of Party for MSH's Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d'Haíïti (SDSH) Project reflects on the year since the Haiti earthquake last January 12 in this video.

SDSH is a USAID-funded health project in Haiti supporting decentralization, strengthening public-sector capacity in service delivery, and supporting local nongovernmental organization service delivery.

Haiti, One Year On: Realizing Country Ownership in a Fragile State

Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 3:00-5:00 p.m., B-340, Rayburn House Office Building, Capitol Hill
This Washington DC event will be webcast live. You can tune in and join the discussion, below, starting at 3:00 p.m.

Dr. Florence Duperval Guillaume, MSH’s Deputy Chief of Party and Technical Director, Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haíïti, will be discussant at this Oxfam America-hosted policy discussion to examine aid effectiveness in Haiti within the context of country ownership. Other speakers will include:

"It's not over yet." World AIDS Day 2010 at MSH in Cambridge, MA.

Today, MSH teams around the world  observed World AIDS Day by participating in national commemorations and offering HIV testing, counseling, and prevention messages.

MSH is attending the Social Welfare Workforce Strengthening Conference in Cape Town this week. AIDSTAR-Two, a USAID-funded MSH led project, is a key organizer of the conference.

Ghazal Keshavarzian, Better Care Network Senior Coordinator, provides an update from the Social Welfare Workforce Strengthening Conference in Cape Town, South Africa. This post originally appeared on OVCsupportnet.org.

Over 150 government, academic, and civil society representatives from across Africa, Vietnam, Haiti and the United States are gathering this week in Cape Town, South Africa to share lessons learned and plans for future efforts to strengthen the social welfare workforce that cares for vulnerable children and families. Funded by USAID and PEPFAR, the Social Welfare Workforce Strengthening Conference is raising the profile of this very important but neglected issue.

This blog was originally posted on Global Health Council’s Blog 4 Global Health. This is a guest blog written by Aaron Emmel, government affairs officer at PATH, one of the sponsors of the event.

Almost 80 people packed the Global Health Council’s conference room last week, with 63 more listening in online, to learn about new initiatives to strengthen maternal, newborn, and child health by improving nutrition. The briefing was held in conjunction with World Food Day on Oct. 16.

Officials from the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) described the intersecting nutrition goals of the U.S. government’s Feed the Future and Global Health Initiatives, while representatives of two global health organizations spoke about how new approaches to reducing malnutrition and under-nutrition are being carried out on the ground.

Yesterday the Direction of Civil Protection and Disaster in Haiti confirmed a cholera outbreak in two departments (districts) of the country resulting in 1,498 cases managed in health facilities and 135 cholera related deaths.

The USAID-funded, MSH-led Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haíïti (SDSH) project is working closely with Haiti’s Ministry of Health and other local and international partners to coordinate a community-level response to the cholera outbreak.

SDSH is mobilizing its established network of over 4,000 community-based health workers to reach Haiti’s largely rural population. The project is working with local and international vendors to procure oral rehydration solutions, a critical component of first aid for diarrheal disease.

For more details reported by SDSH on the ground, see our press release from earlier today.

In mid-June the United States Government continued to show its commitment to global health by announcing the first Global Health Initiative (GHI) Plus countries: Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Nepal, and Rwanda. The GHI is a six-year, $63 billion initiative to help partner countries improve measurable health outcomes by strengthening health systems and building upon proven results. The GHI focuses on women, newborns, and children using an integrated approach including programs that address HIV & AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, maternal and child health, nutrition, family planning and reproductive health, and neglected tropical diseases. These initial countries will receive additional technical and management resources to quickly implement GHI’s approach.  They will be used as “learning labs” – using best practices and lessons learned when implementing programs in other countries. MSH works in seven of the eight countries, so we asked our country experts: What’s working? Please stay tuned for a continuing series.

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