Blog Posts by Michele Alexander

 {Photo credit: Michele Alexander/MSH}Speakers on the Social Good Summit stage discuss AIDS activism.Photo credit: Michele Alexander/MSH

Every September, New York City transforms into a hub of development activity as thousands of representatives from governments, non-governmental organizations, civil society, and the private sector gather for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). This September was no exception as the 70th UNGA kicked off by inaugurating the world’s new sustainable development goals (the SDGs or Global Goals).

On September 27 and 28, I joined hundreds of others in New York City for the Social Good Summit, an exciting two-day conference examining the impact of technology and new media on social good initiatives around the world. Hosted by Mashable, the UN Foundation, UNDP, and 92Y, this annual event brings together notables from all sectors from celebrities to government leaders. Some of the most impactful speakers included Nelson Mandela’s grandson Ndaba Mandela discussing AIDS activism; Facebook’s Naomi Gleit sharing how social media played a key role in connecting people and mobilizing support immediately following the April 25, 2015 Nepal earthquake; and UNFPA’s Babatunde Osotimehin and celebrity advocate Ashley Judd highlighting the importance of access to reproductive health services.

The Global Goals for Sustainable Development

After two years of negotiations, 193 Member States of the United Nations reached agreement last month on the new sustainable development agenda that will be formerly adopted later this week at the 70th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in New York City.

The Member States agreed to 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) with a total of 169 targets. The SDGs will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that expire this year and will influence development priorities and funding for the next 15 years.

About the New Development Agenda

The agenda, entitled Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, is composed of five parts: The Preamble; Chapter 1: The Declaration; Chapter 2: The Sustainable Development Goals; Chapter 3: Means of implementation and the Global Partnership; and, Chapter 4: Follow up and review.

{Photo credit: MSH staff/Haiti}Photo credit: MSH staff/Haiti

Multisector perspectives on achieving resilience in global health

Recent events, such as the Haiti and Nepal earthquakes and West Africa Ebola outbreak, have demonstrated, now more than ever, that a resilient health system is vital to ensuring stability and well-being in society. With this in mind, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and the USAID-funded, MSH-led, Leadership, Management, and Governance project in Haiti (LMG/Haiti), partnered with Johnson & Johnson to host a high-level panel event during the 68th session of the World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

The event, entitled Building and Maintaining Resilience to Address Global Health Challenges, examined how the global health community can move beyond typical public-private partnerships to achieve a model of true country stakeholder engagement. This model would include and leverage the strengths of all actors to build systems capable of addressing long-term global health issues like non-communicable diseases while maintaining resilience to outbreaks like Ebola.

 {Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH}Delegates learn about pharmaceutical management from Systems for Improving Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program staff while visiting Mokopane Hospital in Limpopo Province, South Africa.Photo credit: Bright Phiri/MSH

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) sponsored a Congressional Staff Study Tour to South Africa and Zambia in February 2015 to examine the local impact of US funded health capacity strengthening in Southern Africa. During the trip, site visits and meetings highlighted the impact of local health capacity building efforts in pharmaceutical management of essential medicines and HIV & AIDS drugs and technical and managerial development opportunities for community workers.  

 {Photo credit: Dominic Chavez}Brissault Eunise (seated) watching over her daughter Kerwencia, after receiving breast feeding classes.Photo credit: Dominic Chavez

This post is part of MSH's Global Health Impact Blog series, Improving Health in Haiti: Remember, Rebuild.

As January 12, 2015 marked the fifth anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and its partner organizations, including the Leadership, Management & Governance Project/Haiti, brought together Haitian and US government officials and key global health stakeholders for two days of meetings and events highlighting health progresses made in Haiti since 2010.

Update, April 14, 2015:

Watch video recordings of the summit


Original post continues:

Haitian health leaders meet on Capitol Hill

 {Photo credit: Maureen Taft-Morales/Haiti}A community health worker visits a family and records health data.Photo credit: Maureen Taft-Morales/Haiti

This post is part of MSH's Global Health Impact Blog series, Improving Health in Haiti: Remember, Rebuild.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) sponsored a Congressional Staff Study Tour in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in December 2014 to help staffers get a first-hand account of health progress in Haiti. The overarching focus of the trip was how US government funded health efforts in Haiti are being leveraged for health impact and the role of the Haitian government in that process. 

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