Women & Gender

Uganda. {Photo credit: Paydos/MSH.}Photo credit: Paydos/MSH.

The Ugandan government launched a new prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) strategy on September 12.

Uganda will transition from an approach based on the World Health Organization's (WHO) Option A --- which is contingent on an HIV-positive pregnant woman’s CD4 count --- to WHO's newest PMTCT strategy, Option B+.

Option B+ — whereby HIV-positive pregnant women receive lifelong treatment, regardless of their CD4 levels — originated in 2010 when the Malawian government decided to combine antiretroviral therapy (ART) with PMTCT in response to the challenges of providing reliable CD4 testing in remote settings.

The WHO updated its PMTCT guidelines with Option B+ in April of this year.

Senegal {Photo credit: Galdos/MSH.}Photo credit: Galdos/MSH.

Crossposted on Maternal Health Taskforce's mhtfblog as part of the Maternal Health Commodities Blog Series.

Despite a decade of significant progress reducing maternal mortality rates, very few countries are on target to meet Millennium Development Goal of reducing the maternal mortality ratio by three-quarters by 2015.

Doreen Nalweyiso happily holding her twins. {Photo credit: T. Athura/MSH.}Photo credit: T. Athura/MSH.

In July 2011, Doreen Nalweyiso, a 27-year-old woman living in Mpigi Town Council, Uganda attended her second antenatal visit at Mpigi Health Centre IV. She was surprised to be examined with an ultrasound machine--and even more shocked to be told that she was expecting twins!

“I was thrilled when the nurse showed me images of twins through the ultrasound TV scan. I had never experienced it in my lifetime,” she explained.

This was her first pregnancy and there was no history of twins in her family. Because carrying multiple fetuses can cause complications for both the mother and babies, Doreen received support from the health center throughout her pregnancy.

Since she knew her delivery could be complicated, Doreen traveled to Mpigi health facility to deliver by caesarian section.

If she hadn’t known she was carrying twins, Doreen might not have known to seek out specialized medical care during labor and delivery.

Girl from Uganda. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

The press statement title caught my attention: “Members Continue Efforts to Protect Rights of Women in Developing Countries.”

With piqued interest, I read on:

Congresswoman Betty McCollum and Aaron Schock have once again introduced legislation to stem the devastating impact of child marriage on young girls in developing countries.  The McCollum-Schock International Protecting Girls by Preventing Child Marriage Act, House Resolution (H.R.) 6087, promotes and protects the rights of girls in the developing world.

I was pleased to learn that H.R. 6087 establishes a strategy to prevent child marriage and promote the empowerment of girls.  The legislation also integrates the issue of preventing child marriage into existing US development programs, and requires that relevant agencies collect and make available data on the rates of child marriage and its impact on meeting key development goals.

The XIX International AIDS Conference featured five full days of plenaries with high-level speakers and community activists. The plenaries exemplified the diversity of topics covered throughout, and the global experience of people attending the July 22-27  conference. The plenary round-ups below are a great way to re-enter the experience of AIDS 2012, whether you attended the conference or just want to learn more.

Read more at storify.com.

Karla came from a troubled home where there was domestic violence, drug use, and general turbulence. She was repeatedly sexually abused by a relative in her home.

In 2008, Karla participated in the In School Youth (ISY) HIV prevention program at her secondary school in Region 4, Guyana.

Agape Network Incorporated, a USAID-funded, faith-based organization, leads the ISY program. Agape receives technical assistance from USAID's Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention Program, Phase II (GHARP II), led by Management Sciences for Health with Howard Delafield International and AIDS Healthcare Foundation,

{Photo credit: MSH/Democratic Republic of the Congo.}Photo credit: MSH/Democratic Republic of the Congo.

On this historic World Population Day --- the first with the world’s population at seven billion and growing --- we call your attention to a crucial summit in London happening today, and to the ongoing importance of supporting access to family planning and sexual and reproductive health.

The London Summit

Over one hundred high-level decision-makers are convening at The London Summit on Family Planning in hopes of securing a better future for women and girls globally. Hosted by the UK government and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, with UNFPA and others, the summit seeks to provide an additional 120 million women in resource-poor countries with lifesaving contraceptives, information and family planning services by 2020.

Anna outside Kaginima Hospital, eastern Uganda. {Photo credit: M. Hartley/MSH.}Photo credit: M. Hartley/MSH.

“I knew I wanted to be a nurse since I was 10. A woman used to come home to my village in her nurse uniform on the weekends and she was so smart and nice. It was my goal,” said Anna.

Anna finished nursing school and her formal training in 1998 and started working in 1999. In 2000, she began working at Kaginima Hospital in eastern Uganda, where she still works today.

Kaginima Hospital is an expanding facility and uniquely has a lot of space for patients and services. The facility has a surgical theater with two beds and is well stocked with medical supplies. As a private, nonprofit hospital, Kaginima does not receive any support from the Ugandan government. The hospital relies on support from USAID, international organizations, faith-based organizations, and local nongovernmental organizations. They also charge nominal fees for the services directly to patients.

Rabi giving a public awareness lecture on HIV in her locality. {Photo credit: MSH, Nigeria.}Photo credit: MSH, Nigeria.

Rabi gives a public awareness lecture on HIV. (Photo credit: MSH, Nigeria)

Forty-year old Rabi Suleiman lives in Koko Besse area in Kebbi state, Nigeria. She is married without children. Rabi, who now lives with her third husband, recalls that her ordeal with illness and social ostracism began in 2009. Rabi’s three marriages were the result of her inability to conceive, and a continuous search for a partner with whom she could successfully bear children. In the course of her marriages she contracted HIV.

Weakened by continuous infections and emaciated beyond recognition, Rabi recalls that she was abandoned, equated to animal status and locked up in a hut meant for cattle in her family home. Her meals were pushed to her through a door opening by relations who refused to look her in the face.

Today, Rabi has a new story to tell. With the assistance of the Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (ProACT) project outreach team, Rabi was enrolled with the USAID-supported ProACT antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in the General Hospital, Koko, late in 2009.

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