Women & Gender

 {Photo Credit: Abel Helebo/MSH.}Silenat with her three-year-old child, her husband Yirga, and Tadele, a TB focal person at the Keraniyo Health Center.Photo Credit: Abel Helebo/MSH.

Silenat Yihune, a 40-year-old woman, mother, and housewife, lives in a remote region of Huletejuenesie District, Ethiopia, which is approximately 20 kilometers from the closest health facility. For nine months Silenat suffered from a cough, chest pain, fever, and weight loss, but was unable to receive treatment. As is common among Ethiopian families, Silenat was economically dependent upon her husband. He refused to pay for her travel to the distant health facility. Several months later, Silenat’s husband, Yirga, started to show similar symptoms and visited the Keraniyo Health Center, where he was diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB).

Keraniyo Health Center is one of the health facilities in Huletejunesie district supported by the PEPFAR-funded, USAID project, Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance (HEAL TB), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

Celia Tusiime Kakande. {Photo: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.}Photo: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.

For most of my life, women in Uganda---as in most countries---were treated as inferior to men. Girls were less likely to be educated than their brothers, and had little control over the direction of their lives. Many girls grew up being told how to act, eat, and talk; many women were regarded as little more than domestic caregivers. However, in 1986 the ruling government radically changed the dynamics of Ugandan women in global development and their participation in decision-making at all levels of government. This International Women’s Day we, in Uganda, are celebrating this transformation with a theme of “connecting girls, inspiring futures,” and wishing women around the world similar progress and success.

Women Lead: Government

Women in Uganda now hold more leadership positions than ever before—35 percent of the seats in Parliament are now occupied by women, and our Speaker of Parliament and Minister of Health are women. The introduction of universal primary education has allowed more girls to begin their schooling, and affirmative action at the university level has provided more women the opportunity to realize their dreams for fulfilling professional careers.

Integrating the Leadership Development Program into Guyana's national nursing school training (watch video): Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention, phase two (GHARP II), a PEPFAR-funded and USAID-supported project.

Developing Strong Health Leaders Saves Lives, the newest edition of MSH's Global Health Impact e-newsletter (subscribe), features:

Mary Ngari, Permanent Secretary of Kenya’s Ministry of Medical Services, addresses conference attendees on the first day. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

In my 35 years working in international health, I've attended hundreds of conferences. Conferences are opportunities to exchange ideas and form connections. They’re often fascinating. But once in a while a conference itself can be a pivotal moment. A great example was last year’s International AIDS Conference, the first held in the United States after President Obama finally lifted the longstanding travel ban against foreigners living with HIV.

And recently, people around MSH, and throughout the Kenya health community, have been talking about Kenya’s First National Conference on Health Leadership, Management and Governance. The conference, held in early February, demonstrated the long-term vision of the Kenyans who are running the health system. These leaders understand the value of training health systems managers to improve the quality of service delivery.

The Improving Performance of Nurses (IPN) project in Upper Egypt celebrated the first Arabic publication of Management Sciences for Health's (MSH)'s “Managers Who Lead” handbook with an event last November. A delegation of prominent leaders from Egypt’s health sector---including representatives from the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP), Egyptian universities and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), MSH, and USAID---attended the event in Cairo.

At the event, there was a feeling of hope for the future of the health sector in Egypt, and that this handbook is a small but important part of that future. Dr. Emad Ezat, director of health and nurses sector at MOHP, praised the book for helping to strengthen the performance of health organizations and improving health services. Dr. Abdo Al Swasy, IPN program manager, spoke of the work that had gone into the handbook and its importance. Dr. Gihan Fathy, IPN field manager, highlighted some of the tangible effects from the use of this book in the field, including building nurse leaders able to make decisions independently for positive changes in the health community.

I was circumcised when I was eighty days old, as is the tradition in Ethiopia. My sister was three. My mother had tried to spare us, but her aunt discovered that we were not circumcised and took it upon herself to have us circumcised.

Years later, I asked my aunt why she did it. Her response was not defensive. On the contrary, she responded very matter-of-fact: My sister and I were circumcised so that we could find a husband, have children, and become women. This is the cultural ideology that most Ethiopian women believed at that time, and unfortunately, that many still adhere to in the 21st century---an ideology and practice that is detrimental to a woman’s health.

Female genital circumcision alters or causes injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. There are no health benefits for girls. On the contrary, the procedure can lead to severe bleeding, infections, and problems urinating, during sexual intercourse, and complications in childbirth, as well as later cysts and increased risk of newborn deaths---not to mention the severe pain and shock of the procedure.

In Moen Kas, one of the villages where the project introduced community-led total sanitation, officials and villagers celebrate Open Defecation Free (ODF) certification. {Photo credit: Noorgha CLTS Supervisor/Afghanistan.}Photo credit: Noorgha CLTS Supervisor/Afghanistan.

A new report from the USAID-funded Afghan Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation (SWSS) Project, led by Tetra Tech ARD, describes the methodology and results from the Sustainable Health Outcomes component, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The SWSS project worked to improve the health and infrastructure of rural Afghans, with an emphasis on providing water supply and sanitation facilities and improving community hygiene behaviors (read stories).

SWSS was the first project in Afghanistan to implement community-led total sanitation (CLTS) on a broad scale. While challenges for ongoing hygiene and sanitation remain, the project’s success led the Afghan Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development to include CLTS as part of its national water and sanitation policy and strategy.

Jane Briggs of the USAID-funded SIAPS program at MSH gives examples from Rwanda and Kenya during the Improving Access to Essential Maternal Health Medicines session on the first day of the conference. {Photo credit: C. Lander / MSH.}Photo credit: C. Lander / MSH.

Cross-posted from the SIAPS website.

“Respectful maternal care was said to be more than just a means to an end, and can be framed as several issues: human rights, quality of care, equity and public health,” Jocalyn Clark, senior editor of PLoS Medicine, noted about the final day of the 2013 Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC).

The conference brought together scientists, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to share knowledge, ideas, innovations, research, programs and policies on maternal health quality and access, among several other topics. Participants also worked on building progress towards reducing and eliminating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity.

Quality of maternal care was a consistent theme throughout the conference.

Shelly with her latest trophy after winning first place at a 2012 regional Emancipation Day race. {Photo credit: V. Hinds/MSH.}Photo credit: V. Hinds/MSH.

Shelly has always been very athletic. She competed in both her high school track events and in community races in her hometown of Essequibo, Guyana. In 2010, she was ecstatic after winning a cash prize for placing first in an annual regional championship. However, her life took a turn one year later.

Shelly became pregnant and, during an antenatal care appointment, tested positive for HIV. The news devastated her, as she believed that an HIV diagnosis meant her athletic career was over. Shelly was unaware of how to remain healthy while living with HIV, and so she soon became ill, weak, and lost a significant amount of weight. To add to this, she was unemployed and lacked the means to provide for her newborn son.

Attendees of the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) staff presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013. (Photo credits: C. Lander & J. Briggs / MSH)

Pages

Printer Friendly Version
Subscribe to RSS - Women & Gender