Women & Gender

The US Agency for International Development () and partners are hosting a Twitter relay today, June 24, from 9 am to 5 pm ET as part of the "20 Days of Action for " campaign.

We () are leading the conversation, from 12:30 to 1:00 pm ET, on "All levels, all functions, all places: Building local capacity for stronger health systems".

Follow or join us with hashtag " href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MomandBaby?src=hash">!

View the Twitter relay schedule

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.

Supporting Stronger Health Systems for Healthy Mothers and Children

 {Photo credit: Amarachi Obinna-Nnadi/MSH}Dr. Zipporah Kpamor, MSH’s Nigeria Country Representative, speaking during the African Health Innovation meeting in Abuja, Nigeria.Photo credit: Amarachi Obinna-Nnadi/MSH

"Good leadership skills, flexible policies, and constant advocacy will improve health in Africa," said Dr. Zipporah Kpamor during her talk at the Africa Health Innovation meeting in Abuja, Nigeria, on May 7, 2014. As Management Sciences for Health (MSH’s) Nigeria Country Representative and project director for the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-funded US Agency for International Development (USAID) project, Community-Based Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (CUBS), Zipporah is an expert on the conference’s theme: Leapfrogging development challenges to transform Africa’s health. 

Zipporah offered poignant insight on one of the meeting’s discussion topics: Leadership, policy, and advocacy for health in Africa:

 {Photo credit: MSH.}Women test their new eyeglasses received at The Luke Commission’s mobile clinic in Swaziland.Photo credit: MSH.

The Building Local Capacity for Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa (BLC) Project, funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), provided a grant to The Luke Commission (TLC) to deliver safe medical male circumcision to men and boys in Swaziland. The BLC Project also provides organizational capacity building support to TLC. A version of this post originally appeared on the Southern Africa HIV and AIDS Regional Exchange (SHARE) blog.

Imagine the impact of a mobile clinic on your life if you lived in a rural area, did not earn an income, and could not afford to pay for transport to the clinic in the nearest city when you were ill. This situation results in some people waiting too long to access treatment for serious conditions—or putting off simple diagnostic tests for tuberculosis or HIV—and is why a mobile clinic is of such monumental importance to communities in Swaziland.

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.

Editor's note, June 24, 2014: Chat with us (" href="https://twitter.com/MSHHealthImpact">) from 12:30-1:00 pm ET today, about building local capacity to strengthen health systems and end preventable child and maternal deaths, even in the most remote, rural, and fragile areas. Follow or join the Twitter relay today, led by and partners, with hashtag " href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MomandBaby?src=hash">.

 

The goal of ending preventable child and maternal deaths is within reach.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Mother and baby in the pediatric ward at Shinyanga Regional Hospital, Tanzania.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

The most recent edition of the MSH Global Health Impact Newsletter (May 2014, Issue 5) highlights MSH and global efforts moving toward universal health coverage (UHC) in the post-2015 development framework. This issue includes: MSH President & CEO Dr. Jonathan D.

{Photo credit: Todd Shapera.}Photo credit: Todd Shapera.

In a health clinic outside Nairobi, Kenya, Janet* waits to see a doctor. Janet is a 32-year-old widow and mother of four from Kibera, a neighborhood of Nairobi. Her 11-year-old daughter, Jane*, isn’t feeling well. Both mother and daughter are HIV-positive.

Janet and Jane are lucky to live walking distance to the Langata Health Center, where they receive high-quality health care for free. Jane has been on antiretroviral medication for more than two years. Janet hasn’t paid a shilling. Around the world, millions of people living with HIV struggle to pay for care, or receive none at all. But Janet and Jane are among the 600,000 Kenyans whose HIV care is free through programs from the Government of Kenya, US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) program, and The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria.

Janet wishes everyone could receive the same care that she does at Langata. But even for her, the system just barely works. She explains:

The doctor is only one, and we are many.

Patients at Langata face long waits to see a doctor or pick up their medications. Patients like Janet spend hours away from work and may have to arrange for child care.

 {Photo credit: MSH}H.E. Dr. Suraya Dalil, Minister of Public Health, AfghanistanPhoto credit: MSH

This post, cross-posted with permission from The Leadership, Managment, and Governance (LMG) project blog on LMGforHealth.org, is part of our Global Health Impact series on the 67th World Health Assembly in Geneva, May 18-24, 2014. MSH is co-hosting three side events focusing on the role of universal health coverage (May 20), chronic diseases (May 20), and governance for health (May 21) in the post-2015 framework. This year, six MSH representatives are attending WHA as part of the 60-plus-person Global Health Council (GHC) delegation.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

Cross-posted with permission from WBUR's CommonHealth Blog.

A study released last week found that insurance is saving lives in Massachusetts. Expanded coverage will mean 3,000 fewer deaths over the next 10 years. We have state-of-the-art health facilities and are among the healthiest of Americans. Despite the fiasco of our failed enrollment website, the state maintains near-universal health coverage, and inspired the Affordable Care Act.

Our example is heartening not just for America, but for the many low- and middle-income countries around the world working toward universal health coverage. These countries aren’t just taking a page from our book, though — they have valuable lessons for us, too.

Here are four things Massachusetts could learn about health from developing countries:

 {Photo credit: Crystal Lander/MSH}Gloria Sangiwa (left), MSH Senior Director of Technical Quality and Innovation and Global Technical Lead on Chronic Diseases, talks with another delegate at the Global Health Council (GHC) welcome reception.Photo credit: Crystal Lander/MSH

This blog post is part of our Global Health Impact series on the 67th World Health Assembly in Geneva, May 18-24, 2014. MSH is co-hosting three side events focusing on the role of universal health coverage (May 20), chronic diseases (May 20), and governance for health (May 21) in the post-2015 framework. This year, six MSH representatives are attending WHA as part of the 60-plus-person Global Health Council (GHC) delegation.

Sunday was my first day in Geneva for the World Health Assembly (WHA). I attended WHA last year for the first time, and I am feeling a bit like a second-year college student.

As I prepared for this year’s meeting, a few colleagues asked me: Why is the WHA so important to global health policy? Who attends these things and why? I instantly responded to the questions somewhat defensively: "It’s the WHA--that’s why!"

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